Thursday, December 29, 2011

Are you part of the problem or part of the solution?

If you're not doing something to use water more efficiently, you are a part of the problem.
Water conservation isn't in the forefront of the minds of most people and that is fine as long as you do something sometimes. Every drop counts and no effort is to little; in fact any effort is better than no effort.
Improving water efficiency doesn't mean you have to spend money or get elaborate in your efforts. In fact some of the most effective actions are absolutely free. That's right, you can do simple things everyday and it doesn't cost anothing. What can you do? Stop taking water for granted and change some habits. It really is just that simple.
As citizens it is our responsibility to use water wisely in our daily lives. In fact its not even just about how we use water, but how we use power, food, vehicles, etc, etc. Every aspect of how we live our lives, everyday, impacts global fresh water resources.
Remember; every drop counts, and no effort is to little. Do what you can, when you, while you can and tell others to do the same.

I am always interested in hearing about water saving ideas that have worked for others so don't be bashful; share your efforts and successes with others and let me know what you do to help save water.

Here is a tip to help get you started with something that can make a huge impact on a growing global crisis; stop buying bottled water!

Check out my latest audioboo @ Water Matters with AquaPro

Thanks for stopping by, and Happy New Year,
AP

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Shampoo contain known carcinogens

Parents Alert; please read the following World Wire Report regarding baby shampoo from Johnson & Johnson. 
AP

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "WORLD-WIRE@ens-news.net" <WORLD-WIRE@ens-news.net>
Date: Dec 15, 2011 1:51 PM
Subject: Multiple Carcinogens in Johnson & Johnson's Baby Shampoo
To: <aquapro@askaquapro.com>

Multiple Carcinogens in Johnson & Johnson's Baby Shampoo

CHICAGO, IL, December 15, 2011 –/WORLD-WIRE/– The Cancer
Prevention Coalition today congratulated the Campaign for Safe
Cosmetics for securing a 11/15/11 agreement with Johnson & Johnson
"for reducing or gradually phasing out – trace amounts of
potentially cancer-causing chemicals" from Baby Shampoo, "one of
its signature products." However, this agreement is limited and
restricted to the U.S. market.

"There are two carcinogenic ingredients in Johnson & Johnson's
Baby Shampoo, dioxane and quaternium 15," says Samuel S. Epstein,
M.D., who chairs the Cancer Prevention Coalition.

"Dioxane is a well-recognized contaminant in alcohol ethoxylates, a
group of four ingredients, laureths, oleths, polyethylene glycol and
polysorbates," Dr. Epstein explains. "Quaternium 15 is a precursor
of two carcinogens, formaldehyde and nitrosamine. Johnson & Johnson
has committed to "reducing or gradual phasing out" dioxane and
quaternium-15 in their U.S., but not in their international,
products."

However limited, Dr. Epstein finds Johnson & Johnson's response to
be "in sharp and disturbing contrast to the silence of the Food and
Drug Administration (FDA)."

This federal agency has still failed to enforce the explicit
requirements of the 1938 Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act, Dr.
Epstein points out. This directs the FDA to require that "the label
of a cosmetic product shall bear a warning statement to prevent a
health hazard that may be associated with the product."

The regulatory failure of the FDA extends to its failure to respond to
the Cancer Prevention Coalition's extensively documented 1996
Citizen Petition "Seeking A Cancer Warning On Cosmetic Products
Containing (the carcinogen) Diethanolamine," says Dr. Epstein.

He says the FDA's regulatory failure extends still further to the
Coalition's 2008 Petition, "Seeking A (ovarian) Cancer Warning On
Talc Products Used By Premenopausal for Women's Genital Dusting."

Both Petitions, endorsed by leading cancer prevention experts,
requested the FDA to ban or suspend approval of these products which
still pose an "Imminent Hazard," or minimally to require their
labeling with a "Caution" or other such warning. However, the FDA
has still failed to respond.

"Concerns on the cancer risks of talc, dioxane, formaldehyde,
nitrosamine, and ethylene oxide, besides other prohibited and
restricted carcinogenic ingredients in cosmetics and personal care
products, are not new," Dr. Epstein says. "They were detailed in
my 2001 "Unreasonable Risk: How To Avoid Cancer From Cosmetics and
Personal Care Products," and 2009 "Healthy Beauty" books."

As published in the February 25, 2011 Science Insider editorial,
"Advancing Regulatory Science," FDA Commissioner, Dr. Margaret
Hamburg, claimed that FDA's regulations must be based on "better
predictive models – functional genomics, proteomics, and
metabolomics," rather than "high dose animal
studies – unchanged for decades."

"Dr. Hamburg's dismissal of standard carcinogenicity tests is
bizarre," says Dr. Epstein. "Their scientific validity has been
endorsed by other Federal regulatory agencies, the National Toxicology
Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, besides the
April 2010 President's Cancer Panel."

"Furthermore, as stipulated in the 1938 Federal Food Drug and
Cosmetic Act, the FDA is charged with regulating food, drugs, and
cosmetics based on standard toxicology and carcinogenicity tests.
Moreover, the FDA is not charged with, let alone capable of developing
irrelevant 'tests that incorporate the mechanistic underpinnings of
disease,'" Dr. Epstein points out.

As warned by Senator Edward Kennedy at the 1997 Senate Hearings on the
FDA Reform Bill, "The cosmetics industry has borrowed a page from
the playbook of the tobacco industry by putting profits ahead of
public health."

Dr. Epstein emphasizes, "This warning remains current."

Samuel S. Epstein, M.D. is professor emeritus of Environmental and
Occupational Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago School
of Public Health; Chairman of the Cancer Prevention Coalition; and
former President of the Rachel Carson Trust. His awards include the
1998 Right Livelihood Award and the 2005 Albert Schweitzer Golden
Grand Medal for International Contributions to Cancer Prevention. He
is the author of over 270 scientific articles and 20 books on the
causes and prevention of cancer, including the Unreasonable Risk Book:
How To Avoid Cancer from Cosmetics and Personal Care Products, The
Neways Story (2001, Environmental Toxicology), the groundbreaking The
Politics of Cancer (1979, Doubleday Books), Healthy Beauty: Your Guide
to Ingredients to Avoid and Products You Can Trust (2010, BenBella
Books), and National Cancer Institute And American Cancer Society:
Criminal Indifference to Cancer Prevention and Conflicts of Interest
(2011, Xlibris Publishing).

CONTACT:

Samuel S. Epstein, M.D.

Chairman, Cancer Prevention Coalition

Professor emeritus Environmental & Occupational Medicine

University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health

Chicago, Illinois

Tel: 312-996-2297

Email: epstein@uic.edu <javascript:location.href=>

http://www.preventcancer.com

Join CPC on Facebook



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Friday, December 9, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: Members Named to 21st Century Conservation Service Corps Federal Advisory Committee

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Dec 9, 2011 4:27 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] Members Named to 21st Century Conservation Service Corps Federal Advisory Committee
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

USDA
Release No. 0510.11
Contact:
Adam Fetcher, DOI, (202) 208-6416
Jim Brownlee, USDA (202) 720-4623

Members Named to 21st Century Conservation Service Corps Federal Advisory Committee

Advisory committee will help build foundation for next generation of conservationists


WASHINGTON, December 8, 2011 - Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack today announced an important step in the creation of a 21st Century Conservation Service Corps (21CSC), an organization called for in President Obama's America's Great Outdoors Report. Secretaries Salazar and Vilsack named members of a newly-established federal advisory committee that will provide recommendations on how to build on the important ongoing work of local, state, federal and non-profit youth conservation corps that engage young Americans in hands-on service and job training experiences on public lands and open spaces.

21CSC will empower young people - including low-income, underserved and diverse youth and returning veterans - with valuable training and work experience, while accomplishing important conservation and restoration work for America's great outdoors, waterways and cultural heritage sites.

"The 21st Century Conservation Service Corps will be a way for our nation's young people to work on conservation and outdoor recreation initiatives that drive America's economy and to find new ways to connect to their communities and build their careers," Salazar said. "The conservation-service movement is steeped in rich history dating back to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933. I am confident that this committee of dedicated individuals with vast experience in conservation, outdoor recreation and youth employment will create a system to train and employ the next generation of conservationists."

The committee - composed of representatives of the nation's conservation, service and workforce development groups along with representatives from federal agencies - will provide Salazar and Vilsack advice on a framework for the Conservation Service Corps' organizational structure; certification criteria for Corps providers and members; strategies to overcome existing barriers to successful program implementation; partnership opportunities with outside organizations and pathways for Corps participants to pursue future conservation, community engagement and natural resource careers.

"We heard from people across the country about the importance and urgency of connecting our young people with America's Great Outdoors," said Secretary Vilsack. "Providing meaningful work opportunities on our public lands will help youth gain important skills, develop our next generation of conservation stewards, and accomplish needed work related to our natural and cultural resources. This committee will help the Federal Government to work more effectively and efficiently with our partners to accomplish these goals."

Today's announcement builds on the promise made to the American public during the America's Great Outdoors listening sessions to take their recommendations and move them forward, as well as Secretary Salazar's initiative to establish youth employment and education as a priority for Interior by creating the Office of Youth in the Great Outdoors. Interior is the only federal agency to have a Secretarial-level office dedicated to providing Department-wide leadership, coordination, direction and oversight of youth employment and education programs.

Public lands managed by Interior draw more than 400 million visits a year. According to some recent non-governmental estimates, outdoor recreation, conservation and heritage initiatives support as many as 8.4 million jobs and provide as much as $1 trillion in annual economic benefits. Additionally, one in twenty U.S. jobs are in the recreation economy - more than there are doctors, lawyers, or teachers.

The Secretaries announced the appointment of the following individuals - whose terms begin immediately - to serve on the council.

   Mary Ellen Ardouny (The Corps Network)
   Henry Bruell (Southwest Conservation Corps)
   Michael Collins (REI)
   Dr. Quenton Dokken (Gulf of Mexico Foundation)
   Laura Herrin (The Student Conservation Association)
   Destry Jarvis (Private Consultant)
   Na'Taki Osborne Jelks (The National Wildlife Federation)
   David Muraki (California Conservation Corps)
   Glenn Odenbrett (Great Lakes Education Network)
   Daniella Pereira (City of New York Parks and Recreation)
   Lee Ramsayer (Monster Worldwide)
   Jerrad Schendel (Green Development Coalition)
   Dana Valdez (Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks)
   Charles Van Genderen (Montana Wildlife and Parks)
   Carol Ann Wren (Cook Inlet Tribal Council)
   Myra Blakely (Environmental Protection Agency)
   Michael Ensch (Department of Defense, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)
   Meryl Harrell (U.S. Department of Agriculture)
   Justin Johnson (Office of Personnel Management)
   Melissa Koenigsberg (U.S. Department of the Interior)
   Asim Mishra (Corporation for National and Community Service)
   Brian Pawlak (Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

The official Charter for the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps Advisory Committee can be found on the 21CSC AC website: www.doi.gov/21CSC

#

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (Voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD).

#
[USDA news releases are available in the "Newsroom" section at
http://www.usda.gov/ .]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
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You can contact the list owner at
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Monday, December 5, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: Strategy for Reversing Ecosystem Deterioration in the Gulf of Mexico

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Dec 5, 2011 11:33 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] Strategy for Reversing Deterioration of Gulf Ecosystem
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 9:43 AM
Subject: News Release (HQ): Task Force Established by President Obama Releases Final Strategy for Reversing Deterioration of Gulf Ecosystem

CONTACT:
Alisha Johnson
Johnson.alisha@epa.gov
202-564-4373

Jody Fagan
USDA Gulf of Mexico Initiative
202-720-3210

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 5, 2011

Task Force Established by President Obama Releases Final Strategy for Reversing Deterioration of Gulf Ecosystem

USDA $50 million financial assistance for restoration projects announced as Task Force efforts shift from planning to action

WASHINGTON – The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force today released its final strategy for long term ecosystem restoration for the Gulf Coast, following extensive feedback from citizens throughout the region. EPA Administrator and Task Force Chair Lisa P. Jackson, partnering with Task Force Co-Chair Garret Graves, made the announcement today during keynote remarks at the 2011 State of the Gulf of Mexico Summit in Houston. Administrator Jackson was joined by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Administrator Jane Lubchenco, Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley, USDA Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment Harris Sherman and several other Task Force members.

The Task Force delivered the final strategy on Friday, Dec. 2 to President Barack Obama, who established the Task Force by executive order, to continue the Administration's ongoing commitment to the Gulf region. The group is made up of representatives from the five Gulf States and 11 federal agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency, White House Council on Environmental Quality, Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of the Interior, Department of Justice, Department of Transportation, Office of Management and Budget, Office of Science and Technology Policy and White House Domestic Policy Council.

The strategy is the first restoration blueprint ever developed for the Gulf to include input from states, tribes, federal agencies, local governments and thousands of involved citizens and organizations across the region. The plan represents a commitment by all parties to continue to work together in an unprecedented collaboration to prepare the Gulf region to transition from response to recovery and address the decades-long decline that the Gulf's ecosystem has endured.

"After the Deepwater Horizon disaster, this Task Force brought together people from across the Gulf Coast in unparalleled ways to talk about how we tackle both the immediate environmental devastation, as well as the long-term deterioration that has for decades threatened the health, the environment and the economy of the people who call this place home. It has all come to this moment – when we move from planning and researching to supporting real, homegrown actions aimed at restoring this vital ecosystem," said Administrator Jackson.

With the release of the final strategy today, the Task Force marks the beginning of the implementation phase of the strategy by announcing new initiatives, including $50 million in assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service to help agricultural producers in seven Gulf Coast river basins improve water quality, increase water conservation and enhance wildlife habitat.

USDA's multi-year environmental restoration effort, known as the Gulf of Mexico Initiative, or GoMI, represents a 1,100% increase in financial assistance for Gulf priority watersheds.

"Restoring the Gulf Coast ecosystem needs to begin immediately and USDA's assistance is an important first step in placing the Task Force strategy into action", said USDA Under Secretary Harris Sherman. "This collaborative voluntary effort will leverage contributions and commitments from farmers, communities, and all levels of government to improve water quality. A healthy water supply is not only vital for the people of the Gulf, but also for the estuaries, fisheries, and wildlife that are the foundation of the local economy."

The Task Force has also begun reviewing existing policy, program and regulatory issues that are slowing down restoration progress, particularly in the habitat restoration area. The Task Force will continue to explore innovative ways to implement restoration, measure success and support the restoration with science.

Additionally, the Task Force will also open a local office, headed by Task Force Executive Director John Hankinson, in the Gulf Coast in mid-December.

Representatives from across the Gulf voiced their support for the work of the Task Force.

"To ensure the future health of the Gulf, its economy, and its residents, the nation must start the work of creating a sustainably healthy and productive landscape and seascape – not only stopping the ongoing degradation but beginning the process of reversing that which has already occurred" said Senator Bob Graham and William K. Reilly, Co-Chairs of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. "Working with the people of the Gulf, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force has undertaken the challenge of developing an ecosystem restoration strategy to guide the long term collaboration necessary to reverse the trend of environmental degradation in the Gulf. The country needs to make the commitments called for. And it needs to make them now."

"The Task Force went to great lengths to involve local leaders in the fact finding process leading up to the release of the report" said Mayor Randy Roach of Lake Charles, Louisiana. "When you read the report it is obvious that they listened to what they heard and addressed our concerns in a very straightforward manner. This report is an important document that outlines the challenges of recovery and the opportunities we have to develop a true intergovernmental approach to address the needs and interests of the people of the Gulf Coast region."

"The Task Force's Strategy clearly recognizes the critical importance of the Gulf natural resources to our regional economy and workforce," said Michael Hecht, President and CEO of Greater New Orleans, Inc. "In partnership with all Gulf Coast states and several federal agencies and with full input from key parties throughout the region the Task Force has detailed a specific list of coastal restoration priorities that protects the businesses and individual livelihoods along the coast and across the country, in the fishing, shipping, energy production and tourism industries, that are reliant upon a vital Gulf coast."

"For the first time in man's history on earth, what we do, can and will determine the fate of one of the world's great treasures. The choice is ours", said Dr. Larry McKinney, Executive Director of the Harte Research Institute in Corpus Christi, Texas.

The natural resources of the Gulf's ecosystem are vital to many of the region's industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood production and sales, energy production and navigation and commerce. Among the key priorities of the strategy are:

1) Stopping the Loss of Critical Wetlands, Sand Barriers and Beaches
The strategy recommends placing ecosystem restoration on an equal footing with historic uses such as navigation and flood damage reduction by approaching water resource management decisions in a far more comprehensive manner that will bypass harm to wetlands, barrier islands and beaches. The strategy also recommends implementation of several congressionally authorized projects in the Gulf that are intended to reverse the trend of wetlands loss.

2) Reducing the Flow of Excess Nutrients into the Gulf
The strategy calls for working in the Gulf and upstream in the Mississippi watershed to reduce the flow of excess nutrients into the Gulf by supporting state nutrient reduction frameworks, new nutrient reduction approaches, and targeted watershed work to reduce agricultural and urban sources of excess nutrients.

3) Enhancing Resiliency among Coastal Communities
The strategy calls for enhancing the quality of life of Gulf residents by working in partnership with the Gulf with coastal communities. The strategy specifically recommends working with each of the States to build the integrated capacity needed through effective coastal improvement plans to better secure the future of their coastal communities and to implement existing efforts underway.

The final strategy was developed following more than 40 public meetings throughout the Gulf to listen to the concerns of the public. To review the final strategy, please visit: www.epa.gov/gulfcoasttaskforce
 
R355
Note: If a link above doesn't work, please copy and paste the URL into a browser.
[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Heads Up: All cell phone numbers will go public this month

All cell phone numbers are to be “made public” which means being released to telemarketing companies and you will start to receive sales calls! To prevent this onslaught of unwanted solicitations and use of cell phone “minutes”, call the following number from your cell phone: 888-382-1222.
The number is the National DO NOT CALL registry list. It will only take a minute of your time. This “opt out” system will protect your number for five (5) years. You must call from the cell phone number you want to have in the do not call registry database.

                                                                                                 
https://www.donotcall.gov/default.aspx


HELP OTHERS BY PASSING THIS ON.

 

AP

 

 

 

 



Wednesday, November 9, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: EPA Climate Change and Water News

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Nov 9, 2011 11:56 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Climate Change and Water News
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: water_climate_change@epa.gov [mailto:water_climate_change@epa.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2011 5:37 PM
Subject: EPA Climate Change and Water News

EPA Climate Change and Water News

U.S. EPA News

Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force Releases 2011 Progress Report: Federal Actions for a Climate Resilient Nation

The Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force has released a report outlining the federal government's progress in expanding and strengthening U.S. capacity to better understand, prepare for, and respond to extreme events and other climate change impacts. The report provides an update on actions in key areas of federal adaptation, including: building resilience in local communities, safeguarding critical natural resources such as freshwater, and providing accessible climate information and tools to help decision-makers manage climate risks.  This report follows the Task Force's October 2010 Progress Report to the President that recommended that the federal government strengthen the Nation's capacity to better understand and manage climate-related risks. To read the press release, visit: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2011/10/28/taking-action-protect-our-nation-climate-change-impacts .
To view the 2011 Progress Report, visit: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ceq/2011_adaptation_progress_report.pdf .


EPA Posts Presentations from Consequences of Global Climate Change: Water Quality Impacts, Ecological Impacts & Nonlinear Responses Meeting Online

EPA's National Center for Environmental Research, Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grantees gathered on September 20-22, 2011 to discuss and present the objectives, approaches, and plans for their new research projects. A quantitative investigation was taken up by researchers on how climate change, climate variability and land use change: (1) influences the establishment, abundance and distribution of invasive species; (2) interacts with invasive species to create feedbacks that increase their success; (3) interacts with invasive species to cause threshold responses in natural and managed systems; or (4) affects the chemical, biological and mechanical management of invasive species.  The challenge to assemble modeling systems capable of capturing important linkages between regional climate drivers and terrestrial hydrologic systems and to apply these modeling systems to improve the overall understanding of the sensitivity of key water

quality of aquatic ecosystem management targets to the types of climate changes anticipated over the next several decades was the basis of several investigators research. The presentations are now online and can be viewed at: http://epa.gov/ncer/events/news/2011/09_20_11_calendar.html .


Other Federal Agency News

White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Releases the Final National Action Plan: Priorities for Managing Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate

In October 2010, the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force published a Progress Report to the President identifying freshwater resources as a priority area for greater attention.  In June 2011, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) released a draft "National Action Plan: Priorities for Managing Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate," for public review and comment. CEQ has now released the final plan, taking into account public comment. The final national action plan is to be used as the foundation for federal agency efforts to manage freshwater resources as the climate changes.  It is designed to help freshwater resource managers assure adequate water supplies, safeguard water quality and aquatic ecosystems, and protect human life, health and property.  To read the press release, visit: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2011/10/28/taking-action-protect-our-nation-climate-change-impacts . To access the report, visit:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ceq/2011_national_action_plan.pdf .


U.S. Department of the Interior Releases Report: Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States

This report assesses the status of scientific information available to help understand the impacts of climate change and other stressors on U.S. freshwater resources and calls for modernization of systems to help monitor and sustain water supplies.  The report also reviews the state of existing science and identifies strategies for improving systems to collect climate-related data and water monitoring information. The improvements are intended to help water managers predict, respond and adapt to the effects of climate change on the nation's freshwater supplies so that they can help ensure adequate water quantity and quality.  The report was prepared by a federal interagency panel led by the U.S. Geological Survey and in conjunction with the Council on Environmental Quality, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  To view the full report, visit:

http://www.doi.gov/news/pressreleases/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&pageid=260567 .


Other News

Ceres Develops New Tool - The Ceres Aqua Gauge: A Framework for 21st Century Water Risk Management

The Aqua Gauge introduces a new framework and tool for assessing corporate water risk management. The tool was developed through collaboration with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, Irbaris, and IRRC Institute in consultation with representatives from over 50 financial institutions, companies, and NGOs.  The Ceres Aqua GaugeTM builds on the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability, and focuses on governance and management, stakeholder engagement and disclosure.  This flexible Excel-based tool allows investors to score a company's water management activities against detailed definitions of leading practice.  The tool also benefits companies by giving them a resource to inform and strengthen their own water management strategies.  Designed to enable both rapid and more comprehensive analysis, the Aqua Gauge gives investors the option to assess the company against a short list - or "Quick Gauge" - of core management practices appropriate to the company's risk prof!
 ile as well as assessing a comprehensive set of corporate-level practices that provide a more detailed picture of the company's water management approach.  To learn more and to download the tool, visit: http://www.ceres.org/issues/water/aqua-gauge/aqua-gauge .


Syracuse University to Host Growing Green Infrastructure in New York on November 16 - 17, 2011 in Syracuse, NY

This two-day series of events consists of professional development trainings, tours of green infrastructure sites, and a full-day conference on November 17, 2011 with panels, speakers and sessions on green infrastructure in the Northeast.  Additional information and registration is available at: http://efc.syracusecoe.org/efc/events.html?skuvar=32 .


California Governor Plans Climate Conference in San Francisco, CA on December 15, 2011

Climate change impacts and adaptation strategies will be the focus of a conference that California Governor Jerry Brown has planned for December 15, 2011 in San Francisco. The California Natural Resources Agency is expected to unveil the agenda for the program, which will be held at the California Academy of Sciences next week. In 2009, the agency released a climate adaptation strategy for the state summarizing potential climate impacts and recommending steps the state can take to manage those threats. More recently, the agency and the California Energy Commission released a web-based climate change adaptation tool, Cal-Adapt, local planning agencies, governments, and the public can use to identify potential climate change risks in specific areas of the state. Cal-Adapt is available at: http://cal-adapt.org .


National Academies to Host Workshop: A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling April 27 - 28, 2011 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This workshop will discuss developing a national strategy for advancing climate modeling over the next 10-20 years and will draw upon input from leaders within the community to deeply understand these challenges and to gather ideas for how to begin to face them.  If you are interested in attending the sessions that are open to the public or would like more information, visit:
http://www8.nationalacademies.org/cp/meetingview.aspx?MeetingId=5024 .
  
________________________________________
EPA Climate Change and Water News is produced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). For more information on EPA's climate change activities, visit http://epa.gov/climatechange.  For an overview of climate change and water issues, visit http://www.epa.gov/ow/climatechange.

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: EPA Announces Final Study Plan to Assess Hydraulic Fracturing/Congressionally directed study will evaluate potential impacts on drinking water

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Nov 7, 2011 2:27 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Announces Final Study Plan to Assess Hydraulic Fracturing/Congressionally directed study will evaluate potential impacts on drinking water
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 11:10 AM
Subject: News Release: EPA Announces Final Study Plan to Assess Hydraulic Fracturing/Congressionally directed study will evaluate potential impacts on drinking water

CONTACT:
Cathy Milbourn
milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
202-564-7849
202-564-4355
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 3, 2011
EPA Announces Final Study Plan to Assess Hydraulic Fracturing

Congressionally directed study will evaluate potential impacts on drinking water

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced its final research plan on hydraulic fracturing. At the request of Congress, EPA is working to better understand potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's clean energy future and the Obama Administration is committed to ensuring that we continue to leverage this vital resource responsibly.

In March 2010, EPA announced its intention to conduct the study in response to a request from Congress. Since then, the agency has held a series of public meetings across the nation to receive input from states, industry, environmental and public health groups, and individual citizens. In addition, the study was reviewed by the Science Advisory Board (SAB), an independent panel of scientists, to ensure the agency conducted the research using a scientifically sound approach.

The initial research results and study findings will be released to the public in 2012. The final report will be delivered in 2014. To ensure that the study is complete and results are available to the public in a timely manner, EPA initiated some activities this summer that were supported by the SAB and provide a foundation for the full study.

The final study plan looks at the full cycle of water in hydraulic fracturing, from the acquisition of the water, through the mixing of chemicals and actual fracturing, to the post-fracturing stage, including the management of flowback and produced or used water as well as its ultimate treatment and disposal. Earlier this year, EPA announced its selection of locations for five retrospective and two prospective case studies.

This administration continues to take steps to ensure that we can rely on this abundant resource for decades to come, including taking steps to fully understand any impacts related to the development of this resource. This study is in line with the priorities identified in the president's Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future, and is consistent with the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board recommendations on steps to support the safe development of natural gas resources.

More information: www.epa.gov/hydraulicfracturing

R325

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
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The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
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Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Important changes pending for EPA WaterSense "New Home Specifications"


         Visit WaterSense
WaterSense is announcing its intent to modify certain aspects of the WaterSense single-family new homes specification. WaterSense periodically revisits its specifications and may modify or revise the specification as new information becomes available, new technologies come to market or market conditions change. WaterSense believes there is an opportunity to expand program water savings by taking advantage of improvements in construction forecasts for the multi-family housing sector.



With this notification of intent (NOI), WaterSense outlines several modifications to the specification currently under consideration including: expanding the scope of the specification so that some types of multi-family buildings will qualify for the WaterSense label, modifying the landscape design options, and addressing other minor technical issues.



In addition to describing the potential modifications, the NOI describes technical issues that still need to be more fully defined and resolved. If you have comments, information or suggestions on these issues please contact us at: watersense-homes@erg.com. Currently, WaterSense is only considering modifications to the issues outlined in the NOI. To view the NOI, please visit www.epa.gov/watersense/nhspecs/homes_final.html.



For any questions regarding the WaterSense program in general, please contact the WaterSense Helpline at (866) WTR-SENS (987-7367) or e-mail watersense@epa.gov.



Because Water Matters 

AP
www.AskAquaPro.com 
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com 
www.AquaProSolutions.com
Aqua Environmental Resource Center
www.AshevilleGreenPlumbing.com

And the leak goes on and on and on


And the leak goes on, and on, and on!


Readers may recall a story posted in February 2010 wherein I attempted to bring attention to the challenges of Asheville’s aging Asheville water distribution system infrastructure. The story focused on a particular section of large diameter iron pipe with lead packed joint seals. This pipe is part of the primary water distribution system that transmits water from the North Fork and or Bee Tree reservoirs to Asheville and beyond.

videoIn my previous reporting the visible water leak from this pipe was calculated at approximately 200,000 gallons per year. During my most recent inspection, on September 5th 2011, I again found a leak, considerably worse than I had seen during any of my prior inspections. The current rate of leak was measures at approximately 650,000 gallons per year or 1780 gallons per 24 hour period. On September 4th 2011, I measured the rate of leak at approximately 630,000 gallons per year. Clearly the leak is worsening on a daily basis. Keep in mind the rate of leakage increase as water usage diminishes at night which and pressure builds within the system.

Asheville 's water maintenance department has again been alerted of the condition and they will certainly act to address the leak. The effort will likely be no more than previous, which is to re-pack the existing lead seal rather than replace the failing pipe joint. During the 8 years that I have been monitoring the section of piping, this routine has played out several times, and each time the leak has resumed worse than the previous. This type of repair is a temporary fix and will not last; the leak will reoccur with a couple months. Sections of Asheville’s antiquated system can not accommodate the pressures necessary to meet growing consumer demands.

As this system continues to age, the risk of catastrophic failure rises. If we take into consideration the added potential stresses caused by recent movements in Eastern fault lines that have been quite for decades, our worry is even greater. Asheville’s 10 year strategic plan does not include replacement of this failing water distribution infrastructure. Surely Asheville has this in their Planned Obsolescence Strategy? Even if this necessary upgrade were in their plan, current financial conditions would almost certainly prevent implementation for many years to come. Catastrophic failure is likely to be the catalyst that will bring about upgrading Asheville’s failing water system.

I wonder if they are better prepared for such an occurrence than they were when flooding of Asheville occurred in September 2004. The severity of the flooding that occurred in 2004 was due to the failure of a primary transmission line that draws from the North Fork reservoir. Emergency release of water from the reservoir washed washed away a section of this very old pipe. As I recall the majority of Asheville residents were without water for a more than week. The reason it took so long to repair the pipe was due to a lack of available materials due to it’s age. Does Asheville have a stock of materials to make emergency repairs to this section of piping when we have the next catastrophic failure? 




AP
www.AskAquaPro.com 
www.AquaEnvi.org
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com  

Thursday, October 6, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: EPA Climate Change and Water News

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Oct 6, 2011 4:50 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Climate Change and Water News
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: water_climate_change@epa.gov [mailto:water_climate_change@epa.gov]
Sent: Thursday, October 06, 2011 4:04 PM
Subject: EPA Climate Change and Water News

EPA Climate Change and Water News

U.S. EPA News

U.S. EPA Releases Report: An Assessment of Decision-Making Processes: Evaluation of Where Land Protection Planning can Incorporate Climate Change Information

This report, prepared by the Global Change Research Program (GCRP) in the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) of the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at the U.S. EPA, is a review of decision-making processes of selected land protection programs. The goal of this report is to assess the feasibility of incorporating climate change impacts into the evaluation of these programs. The assessment revealed that there are several strategies that might be useful for incorporating climate change into decision making. As part of a portfolio of adaptation strategies, land protection may become more important for jurisdictions, particularly to ameliorate climate change impacts on watersheds and wildlife.  To view the report, visit:  http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/global/recordisplay.cfm?deid=238091 .  To view the Federal Register notice, visit: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-22/html/2011-24365.htm


U.S. EPA Releases Healthy Watersheds Initiative (HWI) National Framework and Action Plan 2011

The Healthy Watersheds Initiative (HWI) National Framework and Action Plan 2011 is a collaborative product of the EPA and State and Federal partners, with input from non-governmental organizations.  State partners include both the Association of Clean Water Administrators and Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.  The Action Plan presents a clear, consistent framework for action, both internally among EPA's own programs and externally in working with partners.  The Action Plan describes the HWI, including its vision, guiding principles, goals and objectives; and presents an implementation framework for actions by EPA and States.  To view the Action Plan, please visit: http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/nps/watershed/hwi_action.cfm?CFID=6186452&CFTOKEN=50855028.


Save the Date - U.S. EPA, the Puerto Rico Coastal Zone Management Program, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and USDA Forest Service International Institute of Tropical Forestry to Host Conference: Climate Change in the Caribbean: Puerto Rico & the U.S. Virgin Islands on November 15 - 16, 2011 at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico, School of Law

This free two-day conference will provide participants the opportunity to learn directly from experts in the field about climate change impacts and projections for the U.S. Caribbean, strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and steps that can be taken in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to increase resilience in the face of a changing climate.  For more information on the conference, please visit: http://www.drna.gobierno.pr/oficinas/arn/recursosvivientes/costasreservasrefugios/pmzc/cc-conference/Invitation.pdf .



Other Federal Agency News

U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) Seeks Public Comment until November 29, 2011 on 2012 - 2021 Strategic Plan

On September 30, 2011, a Federal Register Notice announced the opening of the public comment period for the U.S. Global Change Research Program's 2012-2021 Strategic Plan.  Every ten years, in accordance with the Global Change Research Act of 1990 (Sec 104, P.L. 101-606), the USGCRP must produce a 10 year National Global Change Research Plan (i.e., a Strategic Plan for the USGCRP). For further information on USGCRP, visit: http://www.globalchange.gov.  The public comment period for the 2012-2021 Strategic Plan is open for 60 days and comments are due by November 29, 2011.  All comments are encouraged to be submitted through this website: http://strategicplancomments.globalchange.gov/ .  Comments may also be addressed to strategicplancomments@usgcrp.gov. Please read the [guidelines] (http://strategicplancomments.globalchange.gov/email-guidelines )  on the 2012-2021 USGCRP Strategic Plan before emailing them.


U.S. Department of the Interior Releases Report: Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States

The report, released October 3, 2011, assesses the status of scientific information available to help understand the impacts of climate change and other stressors on U.S. freshwater resources and calls for modernization of systems to help monitor and sustain water supplies. The report was prepared by a federal interagency panel led by USGS and developed in concert with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), NOAA, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The report reviews the state of existing science and identifies strategies for improving systems to collect climate-related data and water monitoring information. The improvements are intended to help water managers predict, respond and adapt to the effects of climate change on the nation's freshwater supplies so that they can help ensure adequate water quantity and quality. For more information and to view the report, visit: http://www.doi.gov/news/pressreleases/Interior-Report-Assesses-Scientific-Water-Monitori!
 ng-and-Modeling-Systems-and-Calls-for-Modernization-to-Help-Sustain-Water-Supplies.cfm . [or http://go.usa.gov/91V ]


Other News

Save the Date - The German Federal Government to Host Bonn2011 Conference: The Water, Energy and Food Security Nexus, Solutions for the Green Economy on November 16 - 18, 2011 at the World Conference Center, Bonn

The German Government has recognized a clear need for new approaches which address the interconnections within the water, energy and food security nexus.  The conference will focus on the three action fields of sustainable development: The social dimension: Accelerating Access, integrating the bottom of the pyramid; The economic dimension: Creating more with less; and, The ecologic dimension: Investing to sustain ecosystem services.  The conference will put a nexus lens on the three action fields while focusing on better understanding the interlinkages between the three securities. Further, the discussions will focus on identifying enabling conditions which facilitate the transition to a greener economy.  For more information on the conference, please visit: http://www.water-energy-food.org/en/conference/home.html.


The Clean Water America Alliance Releases Report: Barriers and Gateways to Green Infrastructure

The report summarizes the results of a survey of utilities, academics, and government officials regarding barriers to green infrastructure, informed by the ongoing green infrastructure research and education programs of The Clean America Water Alliance. Recommendations were developed and refined through conversations with partner organizations including American Rivers, The Conservation Fund, Low Impact Development Center, Smart Growth America, and the Alliance's Urban Water Sustainability Council. To read the report, please visit: http://bit.ly/gireport.


State of Massachusetts Releases Report: Massachusetts Climate Change Adaptation Report, September, 2011

This report, prepared by the Massachusetts Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs and the Massachusetts Climate Change Adaptation Advisory Committee, is the first broad overview of climate change as it affects Massachusetts, the impacts of this change, vulnerabilities of multiple sectors ranging from natural resources, infrastructure, public health, and the economy. It also provides an analysis of potential strategies.  To read the report, please visit: http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeaterminal&L=3&L0=Home&L1=Air,+Water+%26+Climate+Change&L2=Climate+Change&sid=Eoeea&b=terminalcontent&f=eea_energy_cca-report&csid=Eoeea .
 

  
________________________________________
EPA Climate Change and Water News is produced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). For more information on EPA's climate change activities, visit http://epa.gov/climatechange.  For an overview of climate change and water issues, visit http://www.epa.gov/ow/climatechange.

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
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Wednesday, September 28, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: EPA Releases Final Health Assessment for Trichloerethylene (TCE)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Sep 28, 2011 4:37 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Releases Final Health Assessment for TCE
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 4:22 PM
Subject: Research News Release (HQ): EPA Releases Final Health Assessment for TCE

CONTACT:
Latisha Petteway (News Media Only)
Petteway.latisha@epa.gov
202-564-3191
202-564-4355
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 28, 2011
 
EPA Releases Final Health Assessment for TCE
  
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released the final health assessment for trichloroethylene (TCE) to the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.  IRIS is a human health assessment program that evaluates the latest science on chemicals in our environment. The final assessment characterizes the chemical as carcinogenic to humans and as a human noncancer health hazard. This assessment will also allow for a better understanding of the risks posed to communities from exposure to TCE in soil, water and air. It will provide federal, state, local and other policy makers with the latest scientific information to make decisions about cleanup and other actions to protect people's health.
 
"This assessment is an important first step, providing valuable information to the state, local and federal agencies responsible for protecting the health of the American people," said Paul Anastas, assistant administrator for the EPA's Office of Research and Development. "It underscores the importance of EPA's science and, in particular, the critical value of the IRIS database for ensuring that government officials and the American people have the information they need to protect their health and the health of their children."
 
TCE is one of the most common man-made chemicals found in the environment. It is a volatile chemical and a widely used chlorinated solvent. Frequently found at Superfund sites across the country, TCE's movement from contaminated ground water and soil, into the indoor air of overlying buildings, is of serious concern. EPA already has drinking water standards for TCE and standards for cleaning up TCE at Superfund sites throughout the country.
 
TCE toxicity values as reported in the assessment will be considered in:
 
•         Establishing cleanup methods at the 761 Superfund sites where TCE has been identified as a contaminant
•         Understanding the risk from vapor intrusion as TCE vapors move from contaminated groundwater and soil into the indoor air of overlying buildings
•         Revising EPA's Maximum Contaminant Level for TCE as part of the carcinogenic volatile organic compounds group in drinking water, as described in the agency's drinking water strategy
•         Developing appropriate regulatory standards limiting the atmospheric emissions of TCE – a hazardous air pollutant under the Clean Air Act
 
This assessment has undergone several levels of peer review including, agency review, interagency review, public comment, external peer review by EPA's Science Advisory Board in January 2011, and a scientific consultation review in 2006 by the National Academy of Sciences. Comments from all reviewers are addressed in the final assessment.
 
EPA continues to strengthen IRIS as part of an ongoing effort to ensure concrete research and science are used to protect human health and the environment. In May 2009, EPA restructured the IRIS program to reinforce independent review and ensure the timely publication of assessments. In July 2011, EPA announced further changes to strengthen the IRIS program in response to recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences. EPA's peer review process is designed to elicit the strongest possible critique to ensure that each final IRIS assessment reflects sound, rigorous science.
 
More information on IRIS: http://www.epa.gov/IRIS
  
R293
Note: If a link above doesn't work, please copy and paste the URL into a browser.
[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
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Tuesday, September 27, 2011

ENVIRO-NEWS: EPA Water Headlines for the week of September 26, 2011

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Sep 27, 2011 11:25 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Water Headlines for the week of September 26, 2011
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

-----Original Message-----
From: Amy Han [mailto:han.amy@epamail.epa.gov]
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2011 6:24 PM
Subject: [waterheadlines] Water Headlines for the week of September 26, 2011

Water Headlines for the week of September 26, 2011

Water Headlines is a weekly on-line publication that announces publications, policies, and activities of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water

In This Week's Water Headlines:

1) EPA Announces the Healthy Watersheds Initiative National Framework and Action Plan, 2011
2) Proposed Renewal of Reporting Requirements for BEACH Act Grants
[deletions]

1) EPA Announces the Healthy Watersheds Initiative National Framework and Action Plan, 2011

Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the release of the Healthy Watersheds Initiative (HWI) National Framework and Action Plan.  The HWI is intended to protect the nation's remaining healthy watersheds, prevent them from becoming impaired, and accelerate restoration successes.  The HWI National Framework and Action Plan aims to provide a clear consistent framework for action, both internally among EPA's own programs and externally in working with the Agency's partners.  EPA will work with states and other partners to identify healthy watersheds at the state scale and develop and implement comprehensive state healthy watersheds strategies that set priorities for protection and inform priorities for restoration.

Healthy watersheds provide many ecological services as well as economic benefits.  If successfully implemented, the HWI promises to greatly enhance our nation's ability to meet the Clean Water Act Section 101(a) objective of restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation's waters.  The HWI National Framework and Action Plan is available at www.epa.gov/healthywatersheds .

2) Proposed Renewal of Reporting Requirements for BEACH Act Grants

The Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health (BEACH) Act authorizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide grants to eligible states, territories and authorized tribes. EPA is requesting comment on its proposed renewal of the reporting requirements for the BEACH Act Grants Information Collection Request (ICR). As a grant condition, grant recipients are required to collect and submit beach monitoring and notification information to the EPA.  Collection of this information allows EPA to evaluate the extent to which grant recipients fulfill the requirements of the BEACH Act.

The proposed renewal is available for public comment through November 21, 2011 at www.regulations.gov under Docket ID Number EPA-HQ-OW-2008-0357.

For more information on BEACH Act grants, see http://water.epa.gov/grants_funding/beachgrants/ .

[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Monday, September 26, 2011

My water smells like rotton eggs



What is that awful smell in my water?

This is a pretty common complaint/inquiry in many regions of the US. I was first exposed to this water condition as a child. I remember distinctly the foul odor of rotten eggs as I attempted to drink from a public drinking fountain in upstate NY. I was immediately disgusted by the odor from the water and curious why it smelled that way.
 
The “rotten egg” smell in water is the caused by the presence of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S). This gas, has an offensive odor, can be toxic and is corrosive. Hydrogen sulfide gas in water occurs as a byproduct of decaying organic compounds within the water source. Any presence of Hydrogen Sulfide in your water supply should be promptly corrected.

Most Hydrogen Sulfide conditions are the result of source contamination. Something occurs in your well or spring that introduces organic compounds that decay and create the gas. Another common situation is the presence of sulfate eating bacteria which can live in the water heater, water softener or other water treatment device if one is present. Your first step should be to have the water tested to determine the level of contamination and to determine if any other treatable conditions are present. It is relevant to know the full scope of what is in the water as it will impact how the condition is treated.

Toxicity
Hydrogen sulfide is considered a broad spectrum poison, meaning that it can affect several different systems within the body. It forms a complex bond with Iron in mitochondrial cytochrome enzymes, which results in inhibiting cellular respiration.


Safety
Hydrogen Sulfide gas is a highly toxic and combustible. Heavier than air, the gas tends to accumulate at the bottom of poorly ventilated spaces. Although it has a very recognizable odor at first, it will quickly deaden ones sense of smell, potential victims may be unaware of its presence until it is too late.

The quality of the water you drink, cook with and bathe in is very important to a healthy lifestyle. Don't take the risks; get your water tested.

AP
www.AskAquaPro.com
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com  
www.AquaProSolutions.com
www.AquaEnvi.org
www.AshevilleGreenPlumbing.com

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Warming Oceans Encourage Explosion of Dangerous Bacteria

Climate change is warming ocean waters, causing the spread of bacteria predicted to cost millions in health care as people are exposed to contaminated food and water and to marine diseases at ...

<http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/sep2011/ 2011-09-13-01.html>

AP

Investigation Finds BP 'Ultimately Responsible for Gulf Oil Disaster

A U.S. investigation board blames the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history on British oil giant BP and points to BP contractors who contributed to ...

Contractors to Blame <http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/ sep2011/2011-09-16-01.html>

Friday, September 16, 2011

Article Ice Report 2011

Media Advisory: Arctic sea ice reaches lowest extent for 2011 The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) is part of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder. NSIDC scientists provide Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis < http:// nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/ > content, with partial support from NASA. The blanket of sea ice that floats on the Arctic Ocean appears to have reached its lowest extent for the year. Arctic sea ice extent fell to 4.33 million square kilometers (1.67 million square miles) on September 9, 2011. This year's minimum was the second lowest in the satellite record, which started in 1979. The lowest extent was recorded in 2007.
complete press release at http://nsidc.org/news/press/ 20110915_minimum.html

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Fwd: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Climate Change and Water News

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Sep 14, 2011 1:30 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Climate Change and Water News
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: water_climate_change@epa.gov [mailto:water_climate_change@epa.gov]
Sent: Friday, September 09, 2011 11:20 AM
Subject: EPA Climate Change and Water News

EPA Climate Change and Water News

U.S. EPA News

U.S. EPA Hosts Discussion Open to the Public: Consequences of Global Climate Change: Water Quality Impacts, Ecological Impacts & Nonlinear Responses on September 20-22, 2011 in Washington, D.C.

The public is invited to attend or connect online to listen to a discussion on the Consequences of Global Climate Change: Water Quality Impacts, Ecological Impacts & Nonlinear Responses on September 20-22, 2011.  The EPA will be gathering university scientists, EPA scientists, and policy makers to highlight EPA supported research on the consequences of global climate change.  The topics will include the effects of climate change on ecosystem services, invasive species, pathogens, coastal habitat, and water quality.  This meeting is free and open to the public.  One can join for one or all three days either in person or via the Internet.  If you plan to attend in person, please email your name, contact information, and institution to Michael Hiscock (hiscock.michael@epa.gov) by September 13.  The session will be held at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1201 Constitution Avenue NW, Room 1153, Washington, D.C. 20460.  Visitors will need to check in at the security desk!
 when they arrive.  A list of attendees is needed at least one week prior to the meeting.  To connect online, please register for the webinar using the following link: https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/223362878.  For more information, visit: http://www.epa.gov/ncer/events.


Other Federal Agency News

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Program Office Currently Soliciting Proposals until October 3, 2011

NOAA's Climate Program Office (CPO) manages competitive research programs in which NOAA funds high-priority climate science, assessments, decision support research, outreach, education, and capacity-building activities designed to advance our understanding of Earth's climate system, and to foster the application of this knowledge in risk management and adaptation efforts.  In FY 2012, NOAA will accept individual applications for twelve competitions, organized around CPO's four major programs.  One of those is the solicitation of the Climate and Societal Interactions Research which addresses: (a) climate impacts on water resources, (b) coasts and climate resilience, (c) sustainability of marine ecosystems, (d) changes in extremes of weather and climate, and (e) information for mitigating climate change. Two specific water programs are: 1) the Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP) - with two foci, Water Resource Planning and Coping with Drought and the National Integra!
 ted Drought Information System (NIDIS); and 2) Coastal and Ocean Climate Applications (COCA) with a focus on coastal and marine resilience. 

Proposals are due to NOAA by 5:00 pm EST on October 3, 2011.  For information on SARP, contact Nancy Beller-Simms (nancy.beller-simms@noaa.gov); for information on COCA, contact Adrienne Antoine (adrienne.antoine@noaa.gov).
For more information regarding this solicitation and how to apply, visit: http://www.cpo.noaa.gov/index.jsp?pg=./opportunities/opp_index.jsp&opp=grants.  For more information on the Climate Societal and Interactions Program, visit: http://www.cpo.noaa.gov/cpo_pa/index.jsp#csip.


U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) Re-launches its Energy.gov Website

DOE has re-launched the Energy.gov website as an interactive information platform offering localized data and resources to save energy and money.  Energy.gov modernizes how consumers and businesses access energy information and resources.  The new website makes it easier for users to get information specific to their cities, counties, and states, including information about energy tax credits, rebates, energy saving tips, and grant opportunities.  To view the site, visit: http://www.energy.gov.


U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Releases Report - Climate Engineering:  Technical Status, Future Directions, and Potential Responses

Reports of rising global temperatures have raised questions about responses to climate change, including efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, adapt to climate change, and design and develop climate engineering technologies for deliberate, large-scale intervention in the Earth's climate.  In this report, GAO assesses climate engineering technologies, focusing on their technical status, future directions for research on them, and potential responses.  To perform this technology assessment, GAO reviewed the peer-reviewed scientific literature and government reports, consulted experts with a wide variety of backgrounds and viewpoints, and surveyed adults across the United States.  To view the report, visit: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-11-71.


United States Geological Survey (USGS) Posts CoreCast Series Video Online - Climate Connections: Questions from North and South Carolina
In this episode of Climate Connections, USGS scientists answer questions gathered from North and South Carolina about the effects of climate change on coastal areas and on water resources.  To view the video, please visit: http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/429.


Other News

Global Conference on Oceans, Climate and Security (GCOCS) - May 2012 in Boston, MA - Call for Abstracts and Sponsors Deadlines Extended to September 15 and October 15, 2011

The Global Conference on Oceans, Climate and Security (GCOCS) is designed to: raise the awareness level of the threat of climate change to our oceans and the consequent threat to our human and national security; identify and prioritize the knowledge gaps in science and technology which inhibit understanding, response, and adaptation to future threats; and, generate comprehensive human security policy and governance recommendations reflecting the climate, ocean, and security continuum.  Over three days, GCOCS attendees will explore complex, cross-sector topics and strategies through interactive methods such as multi-disciplinary plenary and World cafe sessions.  The deadline for abstracts has been extended to September 15, 2011.  Sponsors and exhibitors will be accepted until October 15, 2011.  For more information, visit: http://www.gcocs.org/.  


Carpe Diem West Academy Launches Webinar Series Beginning September 27, 2011, 1:00PM (PST) - Running the Climate Rapids: Using the Iterative Risk Management Road Map

Carpe Diem West is a non-profit organization that engages a broad-based network of experts, advocates, decision makers and scientists to address the profound impacts the growing climate crisis is having on water in the American West.  It was started in 2007 by a group of western water leaders acting on a shared belief that the growing climate crisis requires everyone in the field to think in new ways.  The webinar series, Running the Climate Rapids: Using the Iterative Risk Management Road Map, is presented by the Academy to support western water managers, non-governmental organizations, and government agency staff to more effectively use climate science and emerging technology in operations and decision making.  For more information and to register, please visit: http://www.carpediemwestacademy.org/whats-new.


National Wildlife Federation Releases Report - Facing the Storm: Indian Tribes, Climate-Induced Weather Extremes, and the Future for Indian Country

North American Indian Tribes are harmed by climate change, as more ecological shifts and more frequent, more extreme weather events occur, a new study concludes.  Because Tribes are heavily dependent on natural resources, severe weather events like droughts, floods, wildfires, and snowstorms make tribal communities particularly vulnerable.  In collaboration with the Tribal Lands Program, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, National Congress of American Indians, Native American Fish & Wildlife Society, National Tribal Environmental Council, Native American Rights Fund, and University of Colorado Law School, the National Wildlife Federation has released Indian Tribes, Climate-Induced Weather Extremes, and the Future for Indian Country.  The report details how climate change is adversely and disproportionately affecting Indian Tribes in North America, people who rely on a healthy environment to sustain their economic, cultural, and spiritual lives.  To view the pr!
 ess release and full report, visit:  http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/News-by-Topic/Global-Warming/2011/08-03-11-Climate-Change-Hurts-Indian-Tribes-Disproportionately.aspx.

 
 
  
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EPA Climate Change and Water News is produced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). For more information on EPA's climate change activities, visit http://epa.gov/climatechange.  For an overview of climate change and water issues, visit http://www.epa.gov/ow/climatechange.

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