Thursday, December 23, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS: Statement from EPA on Chromium-6

The following is a statement from EPA Administrator Jackson regarding her meeting with 10 U.S. senators on Chromium-6.

The evidence of widespread contamination of US freshwater supply's is a clear concern to human health. Chromium 6 is a known carcinogen.

AP

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Dec 23, 2010 10:07 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] Statement from EPA Administrator Jackson regarding her meeting with 10 U.S. senators on Chromium-6
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2010 2:39 PM
Subject: EPA News Release (HQ): Statement from EPA Administrator Jackson
regarding her meeting with 10 U.S. senators on Chromium-6

CONTACT:
Adora Andy (Media Only)
andy.adora@epa.gov
202-564-2715

Jalil Isa (Media Only)
isa.jalil@epa.gov
202-564-3226
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 22, 2010


Statement from EPA Administrator Jackson regarding her meeting with 10
U.S. senators on Chromium-6

WASHINGTON - Yesterday, EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson met with
Senators Richard Durbin (IL), Mark Kirk (IL), Debbie Stabenow (MI), Bob
Casey (PA), Ben Nelson (NE), Bill Nelson (FL), Daniel Akaka (HI), Dianne
Feinstein (CA), Jeff Bingaman (NM), and Jeff Merkley (OR) to brief them
on the issue of chromium-6 in drinking water as it relates to this
week's Environmental Working Group (EWG) report.

The following is a statement from Administrator Lisa P. Jackson
regarding that meeting:

"Yesterday, I briefed members of the Senate on chromium-6 in drinking
water supplies as it relates to the recent Environmental Working Group
report. EPA has already been working to review and incorporate the
ground-breaking science referenced in this report. However, as a mother
and the head of EPA, I am still concerned about the prevalence of
chromium-6 in our drinking water.

Today, I am announcing a series of actions that the EPA will take over
the coming days to address chromium-6 in our drinking water. It is clear
that the first step is to understand the prevalence of this problem.
While the EWG study was informative, it only provided a snapshot in
time. EPA will work with local and state officials to get a better
picture of exactly how widespread this problem is. In the meantime, EPA
will issue guidance to all water systems in the country to help them
develop monitoring and sampling programs specifically for chromium-6.
We will also offer significant technical assistance to the communities
cited in the EWG report with the highest levels of chromium-6 to help
ensure they quickly develop an effective chromium-6 specific monitoring
program.

The science behind chromium-6 is evolving. EPA is already on a path
toward identifying and addressing any potential health threats from
excessive, long-term exposure with its new draft assessment released
this past fall. This assessment still needs to be reviewed by
independent scientists as an essential step toward tightening drinking
water standards for chromium-6. Strong science and the law will continue
to be the backbone of our decision-making at EPA. EPA takes this matter
seriously and we will continue to do all that we can, using good science
and the law, to protect people's health and our environment."


Meeting Readout:

In yesterday's meeting with the 10 U.S. senators, Administrator Jackson
described EPA's current chromium-6 risk assessment, which is a review
EPA immediately started in response to new science in 2008 showing a
link between chromium-6 ingestion and cancer. This risk assessment -
which would be the first step to updating the drinking water regulations
- will be finalized after an independent scientific peer review in 2011.
Administrator Jackson told the senators that based on the draft risk
assessment, EPA will likely revise drinking water regulations to account
for this new science. These revisions would only take place after an
independent science panel has verified the underlying science.

Administrator Jackson told the senators that EPA currently requires
testing for total chromium which includes chromium-6. She noted that the
testing does not distinguish what percentage of the total chromium is
chromium-6 versus chromium-3, so EPA's regulation assumes that the
sample is 100% chromium-6. This means the current chromium-6 standard
has been as protective and precautionary as the science of that time
allowed.

Administrator Jackson told the senators that according to the most
recent data, all public water facilities are in compliance with the
existing total chromium standards, but she agrees that chromium-6 is a
contaminant of concern. She also told the senators that people can have
their water tested and install home treatment devices certified to
remove chromium-6 if they are concerned about the levels of chromium-6
in their drinking water.

The administrator concluded the briefing by making the following points
and commitments:

1)      While provocative, the EWG report is a self-described "snapshot"
in time and does not provide a full, long-term picture of the prevalence
of chromium-6 in our drinking water. EPA will work with state and local
officials to better determine how wide-spread and prevalent this
contaminant is.

2)      Meanwhile, EPA will issue guidance to all water systems on how
to test for and sample drinking water specifically for chromium-6. This
guidance will provide EPA-approved methods and other technical
information.

3)      EPA will also offer technical expertise and assistance to the
communities cited in the EWG study with the highest levels of chromium.
This assistance will include providing technical experts to work with
water system operators and engineers to ensure the latest testing and
monitoring is being utilized.

4)      Once EPA's chromium-6 risk assessment is finalized, EPA will
work quickly to determine if new standards need to be set. Based on the
current draft assessment, which has yet to undergo scientific peer
review, it is likely that EPA will tighten drinking water standards to
address the health risks posed by chromium-6.


More information on chromium:
http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/chromium.cfm

To track the status of the ongoing risk assessment:
http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/iristrac/index.cfm?fuseaction=viewChemical.sho
wChemical&sw_id=1107

[or http://tinyurl.com/2vug4yj ]

[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Monday, December 13, 2010

Why is a snowfall important for restoring freshwater resources?



It’s not really complicated. Snow melts slowly and therefore more of the water that results from the melt is retained by ground sources.
When it rains the water that falls to the ground generally doesn’t have time to soak in; the heavier/faster the rainfall the less that is retained. Rainwater ends up traveling to storm water systems and ends up dumping into rivers or streams and is carried out of the region on which it fell.

Using a rule of thumb that each 10 inches of snow, if melted, would produce one inch of water, then each inch of snow produces about 2,715 gallons of water per acre. Actual amounts can vary considerably depending on whether the snow is heavy and wet or powdery and dry, so this is based on an average water content of snow.
Heavy snow has high water content. 4 or 5 inches of a heavy, wet snow contains approximately one inch of water. It may take 20 inches of dry, powdery snow to equal that one inch of water. The 10=1 equation also assumes a 'perfect' snow-melt without evaporation which put some of the moisture back into the atmosphere.
Snow pack that accumulates each year in the mountains across the United States are a vital part of the hydrologic cycle. The snows that melt off each spring provide essential runoff to streams and reservoirs which recharge critical fresh water reservoirs and filters into underground which are being depleted at a rate that Mother Nature can’t keep up with.
As inconvenient as they seem, seasonal snowfalls are a crucial part of our lives. We should be thankful for them.

AP
www.AskAquaPro.com  
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com  
www.AquaEnvi.org

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS: Rain Gardens Sprouting Up Everywhere

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Dec 1, 2010 11:31 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] Rain Gardens Sprouting Up Everywhere
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: ARS News Service [mailto:NewsService@ars.usda.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2010 8:15 AM
Subject: Rain Gardens Sprouting Up Everywhere

________________________________________
ARS News Service
Agricultural Research Service, USDA
--View this report online, plus photos and related stories, at www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr
--Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/ARSInformation
________________________________________
 [deletions]

Rain Gardens Sprouting Up Everywhere
By Don Comis

December 1, 2010

Rain gardens are increasingly popular with homeowners and municipalities and are mandatory for many communities nationally. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are finding ways to improve rain gardens so they not only reduce runoff, but also keep toxic metals out of storm drains.

Rain gardens are plantings in depressions that catch stormwater runoff from sidewalks, parking lots, roads and roofs. Rain gardens come in various shapes and sizes, from large basins carved by front-end loaders to small artificial streambed-like formations complete with pebbles. Rain gardens not only slow water down to give it time to soak into the ground and be used by plants, but also filter out sediment and chemical pollutants.

Plant physiologist Rich Zobel at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center (AFSRC) at Beaver, W.Va., and research associate Amir Hass, who works for West Virginia State University in Institute, W.Va., and is stationed at Beaver, are working on improving rain gardens. They are collaborating with ARS hydrologist Doug Boyer and ARS soil chemist Javier Gonzalez at Beaver, and colleagues at the ARS Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC) in New Orleans, La., and the ARS Eastern Regional Research Center (ERRC) in Wyndmoor, Pa.

ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports USDA's commitment to agricultural sustainability.

The scientists at the SRRC found that poultry litter biochar-activated carbons created from the charred remains of poultry litter-is a powerful pollutant magnet. It can attract heavy metals such as copper, cadmium and zinc, which are ordinarily tough to snag from wastewater.

ARS chemists Isabel Lima and Wayne Marshall (now retired) at the SRRC developed the ARS-patented method for turning agricultural bio-waste into biochar. They created the biochar by subjecting poultry litter-bedding materials such as sawdust, wood shavings and peanut shells, as well as droppings and feathers-to pyrolysis, a high-temperature process that takes place in the absence of oxygen.

Hass and colleagues are testing the poultry litter biochar as well as other farm and industrial byproducts at two demonstration rain gardens in the Beaver area, as well as at plots at a county landfill and a mineland reclamation site.

Read < http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/nov10/gardens1110.htm > more about this research in the November/December 2010 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

________________________________________
USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD).
________________________________________
[deletions]

ARS News Service, Information Staff, Agricultural Research Service
5601 Sunnyside Ave., Room 1-2251, Beltsville MD 20705-5128
NewsService@ars.usda.gov | www.ars.usda.gov/news
Phone (301) 504-1636 | fax (301) 504-1486

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Good customer service or avoidable waste?

Having been in the service industry for almost thirty years, I am intimately familiar with the necessity of good customer service. Every business owner strugles with finding the right mix of Do's & Don'ts on how best to build relationships with and retain customers.
With the economy in its current perdicament and environmental issues on the minds of most Americans, I would expect to see trends toward cutting back on wasteful practices. To the contrary I still see unnecessary wasteful tendency in the resturaunt business. Meals that are typically more food one person should eat in a sitting and drinks that never run out. When was the last time you odered an iced tea or coffee and didnt end up with three or four refills. Personally, I prefer not to have my coffee cup topped off everytime waitstaff passes by. I dont mind being asked, but don't just pour me another glass of tea without my acknowledging that as my preference.

How many drinks are left unfinished simply because policy dictates that wait staff keep the cups full? Its even more offensive to when the refill arrives in a new glass while you're finishing off the one you already have.

As a society, Americans are some of the most glutonuos, wasteful people in the world. We could feed small nations with the amount of food and drink we throw away everyday. This is not a sustainable social model! It is utterly avoidable and unnecessary to produce so much waste from resources as valuable as food and water.

That's what I think; what do you?

AP

Monday, November 15, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS

EPA Water Headlines for week of November 15, 2010. The Hydrofracturing report is of particular interest to me.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Nov 15, 2010 2:22 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Water Headlines for the week of November 15, 2010
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

-----Original Message-----
From: Amy Han [mailto:han.amy@epamail.epa.gov]
Sent: Monday, November 15, 2010 12:23 PM
Subject: [waterheadlines] Water Headlines for the week of November 15,
2010

Water Headlines for the week of November 15, 2010

Water Headlines is a weekly on-line publication that announces
publications, policies, and activities of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's Office of Water

In This Week's Water Headlines:

1) EPA Finalizes Standards to Protect Florida Waters Action to reduce
nutrient pollution in lakes and flowing waters, provides strong
environmental protection and significant flexibility for Florida's
communities and businesses

2) Eight of Nine U.S. Companies Agree to Work with EPA Regarding
Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Extraction: EPA conducting congressionally
mandated study to examine the impact of the hydraulic fracturing process
on drinking water quality; Halliburton subpoenaed after failing to meet
EPA's voluntary requests for information

3) Analysis of the Use of Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
Set-Asides: Promoting System Sustainability

[deletions]

1) EPA Finalizes Standards to Protect Florida Waters Action to reduce
nutrient pollution in lakes and flowing waters, provides strong
environmental protection and significant flexibility for Florida's
communities and businesses
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has finalized protective
standards to help reduce water pollution that causes harmful algae
blooms - the thick, green muck that fouls clear water - which can
produce toxins harmful to humans, animals and ecosystems across the
state of Florida. The blooms are caused by phosphorous and nitrogen
pollution from excess fertilizer, stormwater and wastewater that flows
off land into waterways. The final standards set specific numeric limits
on the amount of nutrient pollution allowed in Florida's lakes, rivers,
streams and springs. These specific limits will provide much needed
predictability and clarity to all involved in protecting water quality
compared to the current general standards. Currently, more than 1,900
rivers and streams, 375,000 acres of lakes, and 500 square miles of
estuaries are known to be impaired by nutrients in Florida.

These new standards will become effective 15 months from now, allowing
cities, towns, businesses, other stakeholders and the state of Florida a
full opportunity to review the standards and develop strategies for
implementation while Florida continues to recover from the current
economic crisis.

EPA engaged in extensive public outreach and consultation with Florida
stakeholders by conducting 13 well-attended public hearing sessions in
six cities in Florida during a three-month public comment period. The
Agency received over 22,000 public comments on our original proposal.
EPA worked in close consultation with the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, along with local experts and government
officials, to ensure that the best available science formed the basis
for the standards and that implementation would be flexible and
cost-effective. Florida's environmental agency is committed to
protecting Florida's water quality, has a high level of scientific
expertise, and one of the country's best databases on the condition of
its waters, all of which played a critical role in shaping the final
numeric standards.

During the 15-month period before the numeric standards take effect, EPA
will work closely with the state to determine the next steps to achieve
the objectives of the standards. The standards do not take a
"one-size-fits-all" approach, but reflect conditions in five different
watershed regions and allow for case-by-case adjustments based on local
environmental factors while maintaining water quality. Governments or
other stakeholders can seek special consideration in cases where the
state and local communities have extensively assessed water bodies and
effective measures are in place to reduce nutrient pollution.

The Florida Wildlife Federation filed a 2008 lawsuit against EPA,
resulting in a finding by the previous Administration in January 2009
under the Clean Water Act that nutrient pollution standards are
necessary for Florida. The resulting settlement, reflected in a consent
decree entered in August 2009, requires EPA to adopt specific or
"numeric" nutrient pollution standards for lakes and streams by November
2010. The final rule complies with this consent decree. Under the
decree, EPA is required to issue additional standards for Florida's
coastal waters by August 2012 and will soon submit the underlying
science for these standards to its independent Science Advisory Board
for peer review.

For more information on the final standards for Florida lakes, springs
and streams: http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/florida_index.cfm


2) Eight of Nine U.S. Companies Agree to Work with EPA Regarding
Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Extraction: EPA conducting congressionally
mandated study to examine the impact of the hydraulic fracturing process
on drinking water quality; Halliburton subpoenaed after failing to meet
EPA's voluntary requests for information
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced that eight
out of the nine hydraulic fracturing companies that received voluntary
information requests in September have agreed to submit timely and
complete information to help the agency conduct its study on hydraulic
fracturing. However, the ninth company, Halliburton, has failed to
provide EPA the information necessary to move forward with this
important study. As a result, and as part of the agency's effort to move
forward as quickly as possible, EPA issued a subpoena to the company
requiring submission of the requested information that has yet to be
provided.

EPA's congressionally mandated hydraulic fracturing study will look at
the potential adverse impact of the practice on drinking water and
public health. The agency is under a tight deadline to provide initial
results by the end of 2012 and the thoroughness of the study depends on
timely access to detailed information about the methods used for
fracturing. EPA announced in March that it would conduct this study and
solicit input from the public through a series of public meetings in
major oil and gas production regions. The agency has completed the
public meetings and thousands of Americans from across the country
shared their views on the study and expressed full support for this
effort.

On September 9,  EPA reached out to nine leading national and regional
hydraulic fracturing service providers - BJ Services, Complete
Production Services, Halliburton, Key Energy Services, Patterson-UTI,
RPC, Inc., Schlumberger, Superior Well Services, and Weatherford -
seeking information on the chemical composition of fluids used in the
hydraulic fracturing process, data on the impacts of the chemicals on
human health and the environment, standard operating procedures at their
hydraulic fracturing sites and the locations of sites where fracturing
has been conducted.

Except for Halliburton, the companies have either fully complied with
the September 9 request or made unconditional commitments to provide all
the information on an expeditious schedule.

More information on the subpoena and mandatory request for information
on Halliburton's hydraulic fracturing operations:
http://www.epa.gov/hydraulicfracturing

3) Analysis of the Use of Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
Set-Asides: Promoting System Sustainability
EPA is releasing the Analysis of the Use of Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund Set-Asides: Promoting System Sustainability. This
document highlights activities financed by Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund (DWSRF) capitalization grant set-asides to promote
capacity development efforts. A national "one-year snapshot" for federal
fiscal year (FFY) 2008 is provided, describing the four different
set-asides and highlighting activities that states are pursuing to build
system capacity. The body of this document includes specific examples of
set-aside uses that states may find relevant to their own capacity
development programs.

Copies of this document will be available in hard copy by contacting the
Water Resource Center at 202-566-1729 and identifying document number
EPA 816-R-10-016. You may also contact the National Service Center for
Environmental Publication 1-800-490-9198 to obtain hard copies.
Electronic versions may be found on the EPA website at
http://water.epa.gov/type/drink/pws/smallsystems/state_guidance.cfm#stat
e
[or http://tinyurl.com/394oslk ]
[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Friday, October 15, 2010

Time to get involved.

Here is an easy, free way to get involved in the most important global issue of our generation. Take a minute and help millions of people live better lives by joining this public action. One minute of your time will help save lives and raise awareness on this critical issue. 



Petitions by Change.org|Start a Petition »

Take an extra minute and check out whats going on at blogactionday.change.org.



AP
www.AskAquaPro.com
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com 
www.AquaProSolutions.com
www.AquaEnvi.org
www.AshevilleGreenPlumbing.com

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS: The Water We Drink: Small Community Outreach Campaign

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Oct 12, 2010 4:27 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] Updated Website - The Water We Drink: Small Community Outreach Campaign
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: ndwcnews-bounces@mail.nesc.wvu.edu [mailto:ndwcnews-bounces@mail.nesc.wvu.edu] On Behalf Of Mark Kemp
Sent: Monday, October 11, 2010 9:19 AM
To: nsfcnews@mail.nesc.wvu.edu; ndwcnews@mail.nesc.wvu.edu
Subject: [Ndwcnews] Updated Water Website

Water We Drink Website Has New Articles

The Water We Drink: Small Community Outreach Campaign, which offers information about maintaining safe, sustainable, and secure water supplies in small and rural communities, has added new content to its website.

The website, located at www.nesc.wvu.edu/waterwedrink/ , is a joint effort by the Rural Community Assistance Partnership (RCAP) and the National Environmental Services Center (NESC), located at West Virginia University, and is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

New articles about source water protection, setting water and sewer rates, water and energy, and the benefits of joining your state's Water and Wastewater Agency Response Network (WARN) are available to complement previous articles related to pharmaceuticals and personal care products in our waters, impending labor shortages, and aging infrastructure. The articles are written especially for those who oversee local water and wastewater services, and may be downloaded at no charge and used for educational purposes, such as reprinting in newsletters and magazines, training sessions, and websites.

RCAP's Director of Training and Technical Services Joy Barrett, Ph.D., says, "Our main message is that local leadership is essential in protecting water resources and maintaining critical water and wastewater services, and there are practical options for ensuring the short- and long-term viability of these systems. The new articles encourage local officials and small water utility board members to be proactive in working with local utilities to determine adequate rates, prevent water pollution, conserve water and energy, and partner with neighboring utilities to plan and respond to emergencies."

The website also offers a brochure, a PowerPoint presentation and instructor's guide, and fact sheets about keeping pharmaceuticals and personal care products out of our waterways. The Water We Drink project strives to raise awareness about crucial water issues and solutions, and invites everyone to use the articles and resources to support or complement state and local efforts.
Learn more by going to www.nesc.wvu.edu/waterwedrink/. Contact Sandra Fallon by calling (800) 624-8301, ext. 5582, or e-mailing sfallon@mail.wvu.edu.

The National Environmental Services Center
Assistance. Solutions. Knowledge.

Mark Kemp
Communications Manager
West Virginia University
P.O. Box 6064
Morgantown WV  26506-6064

Phone: (800) 624-8301 ext. 5523
Web: www.nesc.wvu.edu

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Sunday, October 3, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS- Mountaintop Mining Impacts

Independent Science Advisory Board Draft Review Supports EPA Science on Mountaintop Mining Impacts

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Oct 1, 2010 8:56 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] Independent Science Advisory Board Draft Review Supports EPA Science on Mountaintop Mining Impacts
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2010 4:21 PM
Subject: Water News Release (HQ): Independent Science Advisory Board
Draft Review Supports EPA Science on Mountaintop Mining Impacts

CONTACT:
Jalil Isa
isa.jalil@epa.gov
202-564-3226
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 30, 2010


Independent Science Advisory Board Draft Review Supports EPA Science on
Mountaintop Mining Impacts

WASHINGTON - On September 28, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's
(EPA) independent Science Advisory Board (SAB) released their first
draft review of EPA's research into the water quality impacts of valley
fills associated with mountaintop mining. In their draft review, the SAB
supports EPA's scientific research and agrees with EPA's conclusion that
valley fills are associated with increased levels of conductivity (a
measure of water pollution for mining practices) in downstream waters,
and that these increased levels of conductivity threaten stream life in
surface waters.

"This independent review affirms that EPA is relying on sound analysis
and letting science and only science guide our actions to protect human
health and the environment," said EPA's Assistant Administrator for
Water Pete Silva. "We will continue to follow the science and solicit
input from all stakeholders as we safeguard water quality and protect
the American people."

The SAB reviewed EPA's draft report "A Field-Based Aquatic Life
Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian Streams," which uses
field data to derive an aquatic life benchmark for conductivity. The
benchmark is intended to protect 95 percent of aquatic species in
streams in the Appalachian region influenced by mountaintop mining and
valley fills. Based on that science, EPA released guidance in April
designed to minimize irreversible water quality impacts caused by
mountaintop mining.

Following the completion of the external peer review and review of
public comments, the report will be revised and published as a final
report.

A growing body of scientific literature, including previous and new
studies performed by EPA, show significant damage to local streams that
are polluted with the mining runoff from mountaintop removal. To protect
water quality, EPA has identified a range of conductivity (a measure of
the level of salt in the water) of 300 to 500 microSiemens per
centimeter that is generally consistent with protecting life in
Appalachian streams. The maximum benchmark conductivity of 500
microSiemens per centimeter is a measure of salinity that is roughly
five times above normal levels.

[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

ENVIRO-NEWS

EPA Proposes to Cut Mercury Emissions from Sewage Sludge Incinerators

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Oct 1, 2010 12:36 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Proposes to Cut Mercury Emissions from Sewage Sludge Incinerators
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Friday, October 01, 2010 11:23 AM
Subject: Air News Release (HQ): EPA Proposes to Cut Mercury Emissions
from Sewage Sludge Incinerators

CONTACTS:
Cathy Milbourn
milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
202-564-7849
202-564-4355

Enesta Jones
jones.enesta@epa.gov
202-564-7873
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 1, 2010

EPA Proposes to Cut Mercury Emissions from Sewage Sludge Incinerators

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing
to cut emissions of mercury, particle pollution and other harmful
pollutants from sewage sludge incinerators, the sixth-largest source of
mercury air emissions in the United States. Mercury can damage
children's developing brains, and particle pollution is linked to a
variety of serious health effects, including aggravated asthma, heart
attacks and premature death in people with heart and lung disease.

Sewage sludge incinerators are typically located at wastewater treatment
facilities. The proposed standards would apply to both multiple hearth
and fluidized bed incinerators. Units incinerating sewage sludge at
other types of facilities such as commercial, industrial and
institutional incinerators will be covered under different air pollution
standards. Overall, the proposal would cut mercury emissions from these
units by more than 75 percent.

Mercury in the air eventually deposits into water, where it changes into
methylmercury, a highly toxic form that builds up in fish. People are
primarily exposed to mercury by eating contaminated fish. Because the
developing fetus is the most sensitive to the toxic effects of
methylmercury, women of childbearing age and children are regarded as
the populations of greatest concern.

EPA estimates that the proposal would yield health benefits ranging from
$130 million to $320 million in 2015, with annualized costs estimated at
approximately $105 million for all currently operating units to comply
with the proposal standards.

EPA will take comment on the proposed rule for 30 days after it is
published in the Federal Register. The rule will be finalized in 2011
and become effective in 2015.

More information: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/oarpg/new.html

R322
[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
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Friday, September 24, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS- Millions of Americans at risk from poisoned water

40 Million Americans at risk from widespread elevated elevated levels of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Much of the Nation's Streams and Groundwater sources.
See below EPA Environment News release for more details.
AP
On Sep 24, 2010 11:23 AM, "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov> wrote:
This release can be found in the USGS Newsroom at: http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=2599 .

News Release
________________________________________
September 23, 2010

Neil Dubrovsky
(916) 278-3078
nmdubrov@usgs.gov
Kara Capelli
(571) 420-9408
kcapelli@usgs.gov

Elevated Nitrogen and Phosphorus Still Widespread in Much of the Nation's Streams and Groundwater

Complete findings, as well as a USGS fact sheet, podcast, and graphics are available online.
Elevated concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus, nutrients that can negatively impact aquatic ecosystems and human health, have remained the same or increased in many streams and aquifers across the Nation since the early 1990's, according to a new national study by the U.S. Geological Survey.

"This USGS report provides the most comprehensive national-scale assessment to date of nitrogen and phosphorus in our streams and groundwater," said Marcia McNutt, USGS Director. "For years we have known that these same nutrients in high concentrations have resulted in 'dead zones' when they reach our estuaries, such as during the spring at the mouth of the Mississippi, and now we have improved science-based explanations of when, where, and how elevated concentrations reach our streams and aquifers and affect aquatic life and the quality of our drinking water."

"Despite major Federal, State and local efforts and expenditures to control sources and movement of nutrients within our Nation's watersheds, national-scale progress was not evident in this assessment, which is based on thousands of measurements and hundreds of studies across the country from the 1990's and early 2000's," said Matthew C. Larsen, USGS Associate Director for Water.
According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, nutrient pollution has consistently ranked as one of the top three causes of degradation in U.S. streams and rivers for decades.

USGS findings show that widespread concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus remain two to ten times greater than levels recommended by the EPA to protect aquatic life. Most often, these elevated levels were found in agricultural and urban streams. These findings show that continued reductions in nutrient sources and implementation of land-management strategies for reducing nutrient delivery to streams are needed to meet EPA recommended levels in most regions.

Nutrients occur naturally in water and are needed for plant growth and productive aquatic ecosystems; however, in high concentrations nutrients often result in the growth of large amounts of algae and other nuisance plants in streams, lakes and estuaries. The decay of these plants and algae can cause areas of low dissolved oxygen, known as hypoxic, or "dead," zones that stress or kill aquatic life. Some forms of algae release toxins that can result in health concerns.

The study also found that nitrate is a continuing human-health concern in many shallow aquifers across the Nation that are sources of drinking water. In agricultural areas, more than one in five shallow, private wells contained nitrate at levels above the EPA drinking water standard. The quality and safety of water from private wells-which are a source of drinking water for about 40 million people-are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act and are the responsibility of the homeowner.
Because nitrate can persist in groundwater for years and even decades, nitrate concentrations are likely to increase in aquifers used for public drinking-water supplies during at least the next decade, as shallow groundwater with high nutrient concentrations moves downward into deeper aquifers.

"Strategies designed to reduce nutrient inputs on the land will improve the quality of water in near-surface parts of aquifers; however, decades may pass before quality improves in deeper parts of the aquifer, which serve as major sources for public-supply wells," said Neil Dubrovsky, USGS hydrologist and lead scientist on this study. "Unfortunately, similar time delays for improvements are expected for streams that receive substantial inputs of groundwater."

A variety of sources can contribute nutrients to surface and groundwater, such as wastewater and industrial discharges, fertilizer and manure applications to agricultural land, runoff from urban areas, and atmospheric sources. USGS findings show that nutrient sources and resulting concentrations vary across the Nation. For example, concentrations of nitrogen generally are highest in agricultural streams in the Northeast, Midwest, and the Northwest, which have some of the most intense applications of fertilizer and manure in the Nation.

Differences in concentrations across the Nation also are due to natural features and human activities. For example, concentrations of nitrogen in streams draining parts of the agricultural Midwest are increased by contributions from artificial subsurface tile drains that are used to promote rapid dewatering of poorly drained soils. Conversely, concentrations of nitrate in streams draining parts of the Southeast appear to dissipate faster as a result of enhanced natural removal processes in soils and streams.

"This nationwide assessment of sources and natural and human factors that control how nutrients enter our streams and groundwater helps decision-makers anticipate where watersheds are most vulnerable to contamination and set priorities and management actions in different geographic regions of the country," said Dubrovsky.

For more than 125 years, the USGS has served as the Nation's water monitoring agency, including flow and (or) quality in selected streams and rivers across the U.S. USGS continues to work closely with the EPA, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the States, and local watersheds to assure that USGS monitoring and assessments provide useful information for managing nutrients throughout the Nation.

Water-quality data from more than 1,300 locations, much of it in real-time, is available through USGS Water Quality Watch < http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/wqwatch/ >. Additional information about surface water, groundwater and water quality is available at National Water Information System Web Interface < http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/ >. You can also receive instant, customized updates about water conditions by subscribing to WaterAlert < http://water.usgs.gov/wateralert/ >, a new service from the USGS.

AP
www.AskAquaPro.com
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com

www.AquaProSolutions.com
www.AquaEnvi.org
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Monday, September 20, 2010

Study connects Manganese in well water to lower IQ in children

 A recent study conducted by Canadian researchers provides striking evidence that children exposed to high concentration of Manganese in tap water tested lower in standard IQ tests.
"We found significant deficits in the intelligence quotient (IQ) of children exposed to higher concentrations of manganese in drinking water," lead author Maryse Bouchard said in a news release. "Yet manganese concentrations were well below current guidelines." 
The results of the study are published in the scientific journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Manganese, is a free element in nature that seeps into water sources. As a free element, manganese is a metal which finds its way into ground water sources through natural seepage. 

The Canadian study focused on drinking water as the source of exposure for the 350 plus 362 children  that were examined in this research project. It seems to me that an even greater impact may come from exposure when showering. A study performed in 2005 suggested a link between manganese inhalation and nervous system toxicity. It was hypothesized that long term exposure to naturally occurring manganese in shower water put as many as 8.7 million Americans at risk. Manganism, a disease similar to Parkinson Disease, has been linked to exposure to manganese.

Manganese is very common in ground water sources throughout the US and Canada. I strongly recommend annual testing if you rely on well or spring water for your home. Don't take for granted the water is safe that just because looks clean. If tests show manganese is present, get a filter that will reduce or remove it. 


 thanks for stopping by.
AP
www.AskAquaPro.com  
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com 
www.AquaProSolutions.com
www.AquaEnvi.org
www.AshevilleGreenPlumbing.com

Thursday, September 9, 2010

This EPA action is well overdue.

Enviro News: EPA Formally Requests Information From Companies About Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Extraction

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Sep 9, 2010 4:20 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Formally Requests Information From Companies About Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Extraction
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>





From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2010 3:28 PM
Subject: EPA News Release (HQ): EPA Formally Requests Information From
Companies About Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Extraction



CONTACT:
Jalil Isa
isa.jalil@epa.gov <mailto:isa.jalil@epa.gov>
202-564-3226
202-564-4355


EPA Formally Requests Information From Companies About Chemicals Used in
Natural Gas Extraction

Information on hydraulic fracturing chemicals is key to agency study of
potential impacts on drinking water

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today
announced that it has issued voluntary information requests to nine
natural gas service companies regarding the process known as hydraulic
fracturing. The data requested is integral to a broad scientific study
now underway by EPA, which Congress in 2009 directed the agency to
conduct to determine whether hydraulic fracturing has an impact on
drinking water and the public health of Americans living in the vicinity
of hydraulic fracturing wells.

In making the requests of the nine leading national and regional
hydraulic fracturing service providers - BJ Services, Complete
Production Services, Halliburton, Key Energy Services, Patterson-UTI,
PRC, Inc., Schlumberger, Superior Well Services, and Weatherford - EPA
is seeking information on the chemical composition of fluids used in the
hydraulic fracturing process, data on the impacts of the chemicals on
human health and the environment, standard operating procedures at their
hydraulic fracturing sites and the locations of sites where fracturing
has been conducted. This information will be used as the basis for
gathering further detailed information on a representative selection of
sites.

"This scientifically rigorous study will help us understand the
potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water - a concern
that has been raised by Congress and the American people. By sharing
information about the chemicals and methods they are using, these
companies will help us make a thorough and efficient review of hydraulic
fracturing and determine the best path forward," said EPA Administrator
Lisa P. Jackson. "Natural gas is an important part of our nation's
energy future, and it's critical that the extraction of this valuable
natural resource does not come at the expense of safe water and healthy
communities. EPA will do everything in its power, as it is obligated to
do, to protect the health of the American people and will respond to
demonstrated threats while the study is underway."

Hydraulic fracturing is a process in which large volumes of water, sand
and chemicals are injected at high pressures to extract oil and natural
gas from underground rock formations. The process creates fractures in
formations such as shale rock, allowing natural gas or oil to escape
into the well and be recovered. During the past few years, the use of
hydraulic fracturing has expanded across much of the country.

EPA announced in March that it will study the potential adverse impact
that hydraulic fracturing may have on drinking water. To solicit input
on the scope of the study, EPA is holding a series of public meetings in
major oil and gas production regions to hear from citizens, independent
experts and industry. The initial results of the study will be announced
in late 2012. EPA will identify additional information for industry to
provide - including information on fluid disposal practices and
geological features - that will help EPA carry out the study.

EPA has requested the information be provided on a voluntary basis
within 30 days, and has asked the companies to respond within seven days
to inform the agency whether they will provide all of the information
sought. The data being sought by the agency is similar to information
that has already been provided separately to Congress by the industry.
Therefore, EPA expects the companies to cooperate with these voluntary
requests. If not, EPA is prepared to use its authorities to require the
information needed to carry out its study.

EPA is currently working with state and local governments who play an
important role in overseeing and regulating fracturing operations and
are at the forefront of protecting local air and water quality from
adverse impacts.

View the letter on the voluntary information request:
http://www.epa.gov/epahome/hydraulicfracturing/
<http://www.epa.gov/epahome/hydraulicfracturing/>


R296




***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library. The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Peak Water is so much more troubling than Peak Oil could ever be


Those of us that are concerned about climate change and the effects being experienced around the globe, have heard about and understand the alarm being sounded about Peak Oil. People that are really paying attention to the global crisis are also aware of an even greater concern to humanity; Peak Water. 

It's not hard to to understand why Peak Oil gets so much more attention than Peak Water; any guesses? The obvious answer should be money!  More specifically how much corporations profit from oil vs water.  

Water is at level two in what I have tagged "The Trinity of Human Existence": Air, Water, Food. Everything else is irrelevant without the Trinity. 

Due to an explosion in world population, human demand for freshwater already exceeded supply capabilities in many parts of the world; and as the human population continues to rise at an unprecedented rate, the demand grows with it and  many more areas are expected to experience this imbalance in the immediate future. The status-quot is unsustaianable.

Agriculture represents 70% of freshwater use worldwid. The United States accounts for approximately 5% of the world's population, yet the US uses almost as much water as India (~1/5th of world population) or China (1/5th of world population). The industrial sector in the United States consumes more water than the agricultural sector. Currently in the U.S. there are 36 states  in some form of water stress, ranging from serious to severe.

The Ogallala Aquifer in the southern high plains of Texas and New Mexico is being drawn down at a rate that far exceeds replenishment. Portions of the aquifer will not naturally recharge due to layers of clay between the surface and the water-bearing formation. The term fossil water is used to describe aquifers that are not sustainable because the recharge rate is extremely slow. The
Ogallala Aquifer primarily consists of Fossil Water.

In California, massive amounts of groundwater are being sucked out of the Central Valley groundwater aquifers—unreported, unmonitored, and unregulated. California's Central Valley is home to one sixth of all U.S. irrigated land, and the state leads the nation in agricultural production and exports. This can have major implications for the U.S. economy.

The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is a 336-mile (541 km) long canal that diverts 489 billion gallons a year from the Colorado River to irrigate more than 300,000 acres (1,200 km2) of farmland. The CAP project also provides drinking water for Phoenix and Tucson. It has been estimated that Lake Mead, which dams the Colorado and supplies fresh water to more than 10 million people, is expected to run dry within the next 10 years.

The Ipswich River near Boston now runs dry in some years due to heavy pumping of groundwater for irrigation. Maryland, Virginia and the District have been fighting over the Potomac River. In drought years like 1999 or 2003, and on hot summer days the region consumes up to 85 percent of the river's flow.

Nine of the ten fastest-growing counties in the 15 months following Census 2000 (April 1, 2000) were in the South: three in Texas, three in Georgia, one in Virginia, one in Kentucky, and one in Florida.


Peak Water will be the primary cause of unrest and human suffering during the next century; if we continue too neglect the situation.

Listen to the children have to say- and then let me know what you think about the situation.



Opinions please; the subject is so worth your time and requires discussion & action NOW!


AP
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AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com 
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www.AquaProSolutions.com
www.AshevilleGreenPlumbing.com

ENVIRO-NEWS

New EPA Office of Water Web Site

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Aug 19, 2010 10:38 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] New EPA Office of Water Web Site
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

-----Original Message-----
From: Amy Han [mailto:han.amy@epamail.epa.gov]
Sent: Monday, August 16, 2010 4:47 PM
Subject: [waterheadlines] Water Headlines for the week of August 16,
2010
[deletions]

New Office of Water Web Site

On August 12, EPA's Office of Water (OW) launched its redesigned
website, http://water.epa.gov , replacing four OW content areas on
www.epa.gov. Information is now organized by topic in a way that should
be more straight-forward and useful to visitors. Visitors to the agency
site looking for water-related content will be redirected to appropriate
pages on the new OW site.
[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library. The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS

The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central Appalachian Coalfields

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Aug 18, 2010 1:32 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central Appalachian Coalfields
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

-----Original Message-----
From: EPA Federal Register [mailto:envsubset@epa.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2010 8:06 AM
Subject: [epafr-all] Table of Contents August 18, 2010
[deletions]

RESEARCH
-----------

The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems
of the Central Appalachian Coalfields, etc., 51058

http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/2010-20466.htm

[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library. The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

ENVIRO-NEWS

EPA Climate Change and Water News

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Aug 18, 2010 11:48 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Climate Change and Water News
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: water_climate_change@epa.gov [mailto:water_climate_change@epa.gov]

Sent: Thursday, August 12, 2010 5:31 PM
Subject: EPA Climate Change and Water News

EPA Climate Change and Water News

EPA News

EPA to Co-Host the 2010 State-EPA Innovation Symposium:  Environmental
Protection for a Changing Climate and Greener Economy on November 1 - 4,
2010 in Madison, Wisconsin
EPA and its State partners are co-hosting the 2010 State-EPA Innovation
Symposium:  Environmental Protection for a Changing Climate and Greener
Economy on November 1 - 4, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin.  Symposium
participants will have an opportunity to network, learn, and dialogue
about what changes in climate and moves toward more sustainable business
practices mean for the work of environmental agency personnel.  Plenary
speakers and breakout sessions will focus on:  The Making of a Greener
Economy- Emerging Issues and What They Mean for Our Work; Collaborating
for Co-Benefits- Engaging Partners to Maximize Results; and From Climate
to Classic Programs- New Tools and Strategies.  For additional
information, visit:  http://environmental-symposium.org/index.html.

EPA Announced Nearly $30 Million in Grants to Restore and Protect Puget
Sound
EPA announced nearly $30 million dollars in federal grants to help
protect and restore Puget Sound.  The funds are the latest infusion of
federal dollars in an ongoing effort to address decades of industrial
contamination, urban pollution and habitat alteration in Puget Sound.
The grants are geared towards tribal projects, watershed projects, and
outreach and education initiatives.  EPA received over 100 grant
applications for this round of grants. The grants cover a wide range of
projects including removing invasive species from watersheds, improving
salmon migration and increasing fish population, protecting watersheds
from the impacts of urban growth, reopening shellfish beds, purchasing
and preserving critical habitat and watershed lands, funding research to
track progress, protecting shorelines, and educating communities,
homeowners and students about reducing impacts to Puget Sound.
The grant recipients include Washington State, Tribes and local
governments, many of which will work directly with communities and
homeowners on projects to restore and protect Puget Sound.  The
Suquamish Tribe is receiving a grant worth nearly $600,000 for a project
that will restore the Chico Creek estuary, which will result in improved
fish passage and water quality in shellfish growing areas.  The State
and grantees are together matching dollar for dollar the $30 million
grant announced.  Every year, millions of pounds of toxic pollution
enter Puget Sound.  Since 2006, EPA has dedicated $58.4 million dollars
to protecting and restoring Puget Sound.  Link to interactive map of
grants:
http://www.epa.gov/region10/map/funding/pugetsound_funding_map.html.

Other News
The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Releases the 2009 State of the Climate Report
The 2009 State of the Climate Report is a comprehensive appraisal of
Earth's climate by more than 300 authors from 48 countries and portrays
all aspects of the climate system.  Observations span the atmosphere,
land, and ocean from the poles to the equator, and confirm that the past
decade was the warmest on record and that the Earth has been growing
warmer over the last 50 years. The report, summary, and supplemental
materials are available at:
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/bams-state-of-the-climate/2009.php

Union of Concerned Scientists Hosting Webinars on America's Climate
Choices:  Informing Effective Responses to Climate Change and Adapting
to Its Impacts
On August 17, 2010 from 1-2 p.m. EDT, Dr. Diana Liverman will present
the findings in Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change, which
focuses on climate change information needs, information systems, and
communications.  Dr. Liverman is co-director of the Institute of the
Environment, University of Arizona and Senior Research Fellow at the
Environmental Change Institute, Oxford University.  On August 23, 2010
from 2-3 p.m. EDT, Dr. Thomas Wilbanks of Oak Ridge National Laboratory
will present the main findings of Adapting to the Impacts of Climate
Change.  He will be joined by Dr. Gary Yohe, Professor.  To register and
for more information visit:
http://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/what_you_can_do/ACC-Informing.html
.

The National Weather Service (NWS) Draft Strategic Plan is Available for
Public Comment Through September 7, 2010
The NWS draft Strategic Plan is ready for review and public comment
through September 7, 2010.  The draft plan represents the strategic
framework that will guide the NWS over the next ten years. The NWS
strategy will prepare NWS to meet the challenges and opportunities of
the future, while continuing to deliver today's mission and expanding to
meet the growing needs of the country.  For additional information,
visit:  www.weather.gov/com/stratplan. To provide comments, visit:
http://nwsstratplan.ideascale.com/

Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) to Host Webinar: One
Plant's Journey to Sustainable, Energy-Neutral Performance, and How You
Can Benefit on August 25, 2010 from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT
Over the course of decade, plant managers at the Strass Wastewater
Treatment Plant near Innsbruck, Austria made steady gains in the amount
of electricity produced and in overall energy efficiency of the
treatment process.  By 2005, the plant was producing more energy than it
required for treatment.  WERF developed a conceptual tool to optimize
carbon, heat, and energy pathways in wastewater treatment based on
Strass' experience.  WERF's researchers will demonstrate this tool,
which allows plants to benchmark their individual processes against
those of the global leaders in wastewater treatment.  The tool
highlights areas in the plant where the largest potential gains in
energy efficiency, energy production, and sustainability can be made.
For additional information, visit:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/570122601.


EPA Climate Change and Water News is produced by the United States
Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). For more information on EPA's
climate change activities, visit http://epa.gov/climatechange.  For an
overview of climate change and water issues, visit
http://www.epa.gov/ow/climatechange.


***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Thursday, August 5, 2010

EPA allows pesticides to be applied to water.

Pesticides can be sprayed or added directly into or near bodies of water to control mosquito larvae and weeds, without special permitting under the Clean Water Act. On November 21 2006, the U.S. EPA finalized that decision, which affects both direct and airborne pesticide applications to water.

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AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com 
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www.AshevilleGreenPlumbing.com

Monday, August 2, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS: EPA Releases Second Phase of Toxicity Testing Data for Eight Oil Dispersants

For what it's worth, here are the WPA study results on dispersants used in the BP oil disaster. I can't say it will do anything for the damage that has been done or BP will be any more liable for there neglagance.
In my opinion, BP is a foreign entity that has done nothing short of an act of covert terrorism against the people of the United States. The suffering from which will be realized for generations.
AP

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Aug 2, 2010 1:56 PM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Releases Second Phase of Toxicity Testing Data for Eight Oil Dispersants
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

From: U.S. EPA [mailto:usaepa@govdelivery.com]
Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 1:25 PM
Subject: Emergency Response News Release (HQ): EPA Releases Second Phase
of Toxicity Testing Data for Eight Oil Dispersants

CONTACT:
EPA Press Office
press@epa.gov
202-564-6794

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Aug. 2, 2010


EPA Releases Second Phase of Toxicity Testing Data for Eight Oil
Dispersants

WASHINGTON -The US Environmental Protection Agency today released peer
reviewed results from the second phase of its independent toxicity
testing on mixtures of eight oil dispersants with Louisiana Sweet Crude
Oil. EPA conducted the tests as part of an effort to ensure that EPA
decisions remain grounded in the best available science and data.

EPA's results indicate that the eight dispersants tested have similar
toxicities to one another when mixed with Louisiana Sweet Crude Oil.
These results confirm that the dispersant used in response to the oil
spill in the gulf, Corexit 9500A, when mixed with oil, is generally no
more or less toxic than mixtures with the other available alternatives.
The results also indicate that dispersant-oil mixtures are generally no
more toxic to the aquatic test species than oil alone.

"EPA has committed to following the science at every stage of this
response - that's why we required BP to launch a rigorous dispersant
monitoring program, why we directed BP to analyze potential alternatives
and why EPA undertook this independent analysis of dispersant products,"
said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. "We have said all along that the
use of dispersant presents environmental tradeoffs, which is why we took
steps to ensure other response efforts were prioritized above dispersant
use and to dramatically cut dispersant use. Dispersant use virtually
ended when the cap was placed on the well and its use dropped 72 percent
from peak volumes following the joint EPA-U.S. Coast Guard directive to
BP in late May."

The standard acute toxicity tests were conducted on juvenile shrimp and
small fish that are found in the gulf and are commonly used in toxicity
testing. The tests were conducted on mixtures of Louisiana Sweet Crude
Oil and eight different dispersant products found on the National
Contingency Plan Product Schedule - Dispersit SPC 1000, Nokomis 3-F4,
Nokomis 3-AA, ZI-400, SAFRON Gold, Sea Brat #4, Corexit 9500 A and JD
2000. The same eight dispersants were used during EPA's first round of
independent toxicity testing.

All eight dispersants were found to be less toxic than the
dispersant-oil mixture to both test species. Louisiana Sweet Crude Oil
was more toxic to mysid shrimp than the eight dispersants when tested
alone. Oil alone had similar toxicity to mysid shrimp as the
dispersant-oil mixtures, with exception of the mixture of Nokomis 3-AA
and oil, which was found to be more toxic than oil.

While there has been virtually no dispersant use since the well was
capped on July 15 - only 200 gallons total applied on July 19 - EPA's
environmental monitoring continues.

EPA required rigorous, ongoing monitoring as a condition of authorizing
BP's use of dispersant in the gulf. Dispersants prevent some oil from
impacting sensitive areas along the gulf coast. EPA's position has been
that BP should use as little dispersant as necessary and, on May 23,
Administrator Jackson and then-federal on-scene coordinator Rear Admiral
Mary Landry directed BP to reduce dispersant usage by 75 percent from
peak usage. EPA and the Coast Guard formalized that order in a directive
to BP on May 26.

Before directing BP to ramp down dispersant use, EPA directed BP to
analyze potential alternative dispersants for toxicity and
effectiveness. BP reported to EPA that they were unable to find a
dispersant that is less toxic than Corexit 9500, the product then in
use. Following that, EPA began its own scientific testing of eight
dispersant products.

EPA released the first round of data - on the dispersant products alone
- on June 30. Today's results represent the second and final stage of
the independent acute toxicity tests.

View the toxicity test results: http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/dispersants


R263

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***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
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The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
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Wednesday, July 28, 2010

The United States abstains from declaring safe water and sanitation as a basic human right.

To much to loose?

Today is a day worth noting in human history. I have long been an advocate for declaring safe water as a basic human right; along with the other two necessities for sustaining life- safe food & safe air. It’s the trinity of survival; Air, Water, Food; everything else is non-essential. I believe that as a species this trinity of survival should be an inalienable right for all human beings; regardless of cost or degree of challenge.

41 county’s chose to abstain. I am eager to hear the reasoning behind the decisions. I would venture to make an educated guess and preempt the coming disclosures as being politically motivated on behalf of the citizens. They will proclaim inadequacies and lack of clearly defined rolls and responsibilities governments. The reasons will be relative to potential liabilities, costs and burdens. What you won’t hear is how they don’t want to loose their rights to sell water or relinquish control of it for profit and power.

UN record of vote and comments:

Introducing a draft resolution on the human right to water and sanitation (document A/64/L.63/Rev.1), the representative of Bolivia said that human right had not been fully recognized, despite

Monday, July 26, 2010

The Truth About Fracking (By Brita Belli)

Hydrofraking is ruins water supplies sources at the expense of communities. Loopholes must be closed. Which side of the fence will Obama land on? Does our government have the power to control big oil.
The Truth About Fracking (By Brita Belli)

AP
Www.AskAquaPro.com, www.AquaProSolutions.com, www.AquaEnvvi.org, www.H2oEasy.com

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

ENVIRO-NEWS

EPA Water Headlines; week of July 12, 2010

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Makuch, Joseph" <Joseph.Makuch@ars.usda.gov>
Date: Jul 13, 2010 10:27 AM
Subject: [ENVIRO-NEWS] EPA Water Headlines for the week of July 12, 2010
To: <Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov>

-----Original Message-----
From: Amy Han [mailto:han.amy@epamail.epa.gov]
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2010 7:01 PM
Subject: [waterheadlines] Water Headlines for the week of July 12, 2010

Water Headlines for the week of July 12, 2010

Water Headlines is a weekly on-line publication that announces
publications, policies, and activities of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's Office of Water

In This Week's Water Headlines:

1) New Consumer Campaign Kicks off: We're for Water
2) Drinking Water Strategy Web Dialogue: A New Framework for Addressing
Contaminants as Group(s)
3) EPA Seeking Public Comment and Input on Requests to Revise the
Performance Standards for Marine Sanitation Devices
[deletions]

1) New Consumer Campaign Kicks off: We're for Water
EPA's WaterSense(r) program will kick off the new multi-year We're for
Water campaign July 14, 2010 to educate consumers about water-saving
behaviors and WaterSense labeled products.

We're for Water shows consumers that saving water can be as easy as
check, twist, replace.
1.      Check toilets for silent leaks, which can waste enough water
each year to fill a backyard swimming pool.
2.      Twist on a WaterSense labeled bathroom faucet aerator to save
water and energy at the tap without noticing a difference in flow.
3.      Replace old, inefficient showerheads with WaterSense labeled
models that use less water and energy, but provide a shower with power.

Consumers are encouraged to adopt one or all of these water-saving
behaviors and take the "I'm for Water" pledge on the WaterSense website.

Follow Flo, the We're for Water "spokesgallon," as she takes a road trip
across the country to launch the campaign and educate people about water
efficiency at www.epa.gov/watersense/wereforwater or
www.facebook.com/epawatersense .

2) Drinking Water Strategy Web Dialogue: A New Framework for Addressing
Contaminants as Group(s)
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator,
Lisa P. Jackson, has outlined four principles to provide greater
protection of drinking water, one of which is to address contaminants as
group(s).

On July 28-29, EPA will hold a web dialogue focused on addressing
contaminants as group(s). EPA welcomes your input on approaches EPA
should consider when developing a framework to group contaminants.  This
dialogue will provide an opportunity for participants to exchange
information and share ideas. EPA will consider the feedback from this
Web dialogue and information from this exchange as it develops the
agenda for the upcoming Drinking Water Strategy stakeholder meeting and
the framework for addressing contaminants as group(s).

Register for the July 28-29 web dialogue at
www.webdialogues.net/epa/dwcontaminantgroups

For more information on the four principles of the Drinking Water
Strategy, visit www.epa.gov/safewater/sdwa/dwstrategy.html

3) EPA Seeking Public Comment and Input on Requests to Revise the
Performance Standards for Marine Sanitation Devices
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) received a petition and
another separate request (collectively, "rulemaking requests") to revise
its regulations establishing performance standards for marine sanitation
devices (MSDs) (devices that treat vessel sewage) pursuant to the
Agency's authority under section 312(b)(1) of the Clean Water Act (CWA).
The rulemaking petition also requests that EPA establish monitoring,
recordkeeping and reporting requirements under the CWA to ensure
compliance with the performance standards.

EPA published a Federal Register (FR) Notice to make the public aware of
the issues raised in the rulemaking requests and to obtain the public's
input, in the form of comment and relevant information, to help EPA
determine appropriate action in response to the requests.  EPA has not
made a decision on whether to grant or deny either rulemaking request,
and is not making any changes to the MSD performance standards at this
time.

The FR Notice is titled "Clean Water Act Section 312(b): Notice Seeking
Stakeholder Input on Petition and Other Request to Revise the
Performance Standards for Marine Sanitation Devices", and is posted at
http://www.epa.gov/owow/oceans/regulatory/frnotice_marinesanitation.html
.

Comments in response to this FR Notice must be received on or before
November 9, 2010.
[deletions]

***********************************************
Enviro-News is a service of the Water Quality
Information Center at the National Agricultural
Library.  The center's Web site is at
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/.

The Enviro-News list facilitates information exchange.
Inclusion of an item in Enviro-News does not imply
United States Department of Agriculture(USDA) agreement,
nor does USDA attest to the accuracy or completeness of
the item. See
http://www.nal.usda.gov/wqic/environews.shtml#disclaimer
You can contact the list owner at
owner-Enviro-News@ars.usda.gov.
***********************************************

Monday, July 12, 2010

BP's Oil is in our food chain!

It's time to pay close attention to where your seafood comes from.
One very troubling aspect of the BP Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico is that the direct and indirect environmental effects will be felt all over the world and for decades to come. Only two months in and we are seeing the oil entering our food chain!




This is a bottom up scenario and humans are at the top. This problem alone could have devastating effects on our economy and health. What we are witnessing in the lower ranks of the food chain will become our experience as we continue to see the oil penetrate into every aspect of our food and water sources. Today as they again try to cap this well it is to late to prevent what will surely be devastating to marine life. Ohhhh the shame of it; but does BP care, and will they be held responsible? Not likely unless we  make it so! I have little faith that our government will hold BP fully accountable.
What do you think?   


AP
AquaPro@AskaquaPro.com